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Raumfahrt - Work On Chandrayaan-3 Started: ISRO Chief Sivan had stated that Chandrayaan-3s configuration will be almost similar to Chandrayaan-2 but the new mission will have a rover with a propulsio

23.01.2020

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The work on Chandrayaan-3 mission has started and it is going on at full speed, ISRO chief K Sivan said on Wednesday.

"The work on Chandrayaan-3 has started and it is going at full speed," he told reporters here. Asked whether ISRO look at a manned mission to the Moon, Sivan said, "Definitely someday but not immediately." 

Earlier this month, Sivan had stated that Chandrayaan-3's configuration will be almost similar to Chandrayaan-2 but the new mission will have a rover with a propulsion module.

"In Chandrayaan-2 we had orbiter, lander and rover configuration. But the Chandrayaan-3 will be having a lander and rover with a propulsion module. The work is being carried out very smoothly," he had said.

Sivan further said that Chandrayaan-3's lander and craft cost is approximately Rs 250 crore, whereas the launch cost will be around Rs 350 crore. 

Quelle: Businessworld

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Update: 6.03.2020

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ISRO to launch Chandrayaan-3 in first half of 2021: Govt

Chandrayaan-3 will be launched in the first half of 2021, Union Minister Jitendra Singh said, indicating that there could be a slight delay in the launch of the third moon mission.

In a written response to a question in Lok Sabha, Minister of State in the Prime Minister's Office Singh said four biological and two physical science experiments related to microgravity will be conducted during the Gaganyaan project, India's manned mission to space.
Singh said the revised configuration takes care of the robustness in design, capacity enhancement for mission flexibility and at the same time retained the heritage of Chandrayaan-II to the extent possible.
"The tentative launch schedule for Chandrayaan–III is first half of 2021. Chandrayaan–III mission has been configured based on the lessons learnt from Chadrayaan – II," Singh said.
Chandrayaan-II hard-landed on lunar surface last year.

The Indian Space Research Organisation had then resolved to launch the project again. It had said the project is likely to be launched by the end of the year.
Elaborating on the progress made on Gaganyaan, Singh said hardware realisation has commenced for ground test and space flight training of four astronaut candidates has also commenced.

"Four biological and two physical science experiments related to microgravity from academic institutions are short-listed...," Singh said.
National collaboration for design, development and delivery of human-centric products such as crew medical kit, crew health monitoring system, emergency survival kit, dosimeters, earmuffs and fire suppression system has started, Singh said.
A three-week training programme for flight surgeon was also completed at ISRO with participation of CNES, the space agency of France, he added.
Quelle: DECCAN HERALD

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Update: 30.08.2020

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Chandrayaan-3: Isro to create Moon craters 200km from Bengaluru

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Quelle: The Times of India

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Update: 8.09.2020

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'Chandrayaan-3' moon mission to be launched early next year, won't include orbiter this time

India's 'Chandrayaan-3' moon mission is likely to be launched early next year, i.e. in the first quarter of 2021. The third planned lunar exploration mission by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) is likely to only include a 'lander' and a 'rover' similar to that of Chandrayaan-2 but will not have an orbiter. This information was provided by Union Minister Jitendra Singh, the Minister of State (MoS) for the Department of Space. 

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India's 'Chandrayaan-3' moon mission is likely to be launched early next year, i.e. in the first quarter of 2021. The third planned lunar exploration mission by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) is likely to only include a 'lander' and a 'rover' similar to that of Chandrayaan-2 but will not have an orbiter. This information was provided by Union Minister Jitendra Singh, the Minister of State (MoS) for the Department of Space. 

Contact with Chandrayaan-2 was broken in September last year when the snag in communication led to the failure of the mission's soft landing attempt on the lunar surface after successful orbital insertion. Thereafter, ISRO proposed the launch of 'Chandrayaan-3', the third lunar exploration mission that will successfully demonstrate soft landing this time.

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic outbreak and the subsequent COVID-19-necessitated lockdown led to a delay in the launch of the 'Chandrayaan-3' lunar exploration mission. It is now expected to be launched in early 2021. However, if this schedule is adhered to, India will become the world's fourth country to conduct a soft lunar landing.

 

Along with the Chandrayaan-3, preparations are also on for India's first expedition to send humans into space. It can be launched around 2022, sources said.

Notably, although the contact has been lost with Chandrayaan-2's lander and rover, the orbiter is still doing its job and orbiting the Moon on a polar orbit at an altitude of 100 km, conducting high-resolution observations of the landing site prior to the separation of the lander from the orbiter.

Quelle: DNA

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Isro's Chandrayaan-3 to lift off for Moon in early 2021, without orbiter

The mission has been delayed by the coronavirus pandemic and the follow-up lockdowns. The launch which was planned for 2020 will now take off for the Lunar surface sometime in early 2021

he Indian Space and Research Organisation (Isro) is swiftly moving ahead with the mission likely to be launched in early 2021. However, unlike Chandrayaan-2, it will not have an orbiter but will include a lander and a rover, Union Minister Jitendra Singh said.

The mission has been delayed by the pandemic and the follow-up lockdowns. The launch which was planned for 2020 will now take off for the Lunar surface sometime in early 2021.

will be a mission repeat of Chandrayaan-2 and will include a Lander and Rover similar to that of Chandrayaan-2, but will not have an orbiter, a statement quoting Singh said. Planned to land on the South Pole of the Moon, Chandrayaan-2 was launched on July 22 last year. However, the lander Vikram hard-landed on September 7, crashing India's dream to become the first nation to successfully touch down on the lunar surface in its maiden attempt.

The orbiter of the mission is working fine and has been sending data, had indicated that the third will utilise the orbiter already in the lunar orbit.

Moon is rusting discovers Chandrayaan-1

has sent images that show that Moon may be rusting along the poles. The sign of this finding is that even though the surface of the Moon is known to have iron-rich rocks, it is not known for the presence of water and oxygen, which are the two elements needed to interact with iron to create rust.

A new paper in Science Advances reviews data from the Indian Space Research Organization's orbiter, which discovered water ice and mapped out a variety of minerals while surveying the Moon's surface in 2008.

The mystery starts with the solar wind, a stream of charged particles that flows out from the Sun, bombarding Earth and the Moon with hydrogen. Hydrogen makes it harder for hematite to form. It's what is known as a reducer, meaning it adds electrons to the materials it interacts with. That's the opposite of what is needed to make hematite: For iron to rust, it requires an oxidizer, which removes electrons. And while the Earth has a magnetic field shielding it from this hydrogen, the Moon does not.

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The blue areas in this composite image from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) aboard the Indian Space Research Organization's orbiter show water concentrated at the Moon's poles.

"It's very puzzling," lead author Shuai Li of the University of Hawaii said. "The Moon is a terrible environment for hematite to form in." The paper offers a three-pronged model to explain how rust might form in such an environment. For starters, while the Moon lacks an atmosphere, it is in fact home to trace amounts of oxygen. The source of that oxygen: Earth's magnetic field trails behind the planet like a windsock.

The Moon has been inching away from Earth for billions of years, so it's also possible that more oxygen hopped across this rift when the two were closer in the ancient past.

Quelle: Business Standard

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