Blogarchiv

Sonntag, 30. Dezember 2012 - 17:28 Uhr

Luftfahrt - 15-Tage-Flugtest von X-47B auf Flugzeugträger USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75)

.

During a 15-day underway period aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) in December 2012, the X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System demonstrator completed a series of deck handling tests, including the first Control Display Unit (CDU) taxi at sea. (U.S. Navy photo)

-

NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- The X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System demonstrator returned to Naval Station Norfolk aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Dec. 18 after successfully completing a series of deck handling tests in preparation for its first carrier-based launch and recovery next year.

“The UCAS-D combined government/Northrop Grumman team should be commended for their professionalism, commitment to testing excellence and ability to successfully accomplish all primary test objectives,” said Rear Adm. Mat Winter, program executive officer for Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons. “Additionally, I want to thank the entire USS Harry S. Truman crew for their over and above support for our dynamic and versatile testing evolution.”

UCAS-D testing began Nov. 28, just one day after the demonstrator, designated AV-2, was hoisted onto the carrier. While in port, the aircraft conducted system checkouts and other testing including the first ever powered flight deck taxi test on Dec. 1, just three days prior to getting underway for the at-sea testing.

“Deck operators executed multiple handoffs, tight turns and taxiing of the nose wheel over a cross deck pendant from a dead stop, a particularly challenging deck operator handling challenge,” said Capt. Jaime Engdahl, Navy UCAS program manager.

During the 15-day underway period, AV-2 completed numerous communication and telemetry checks on the flight deck, including the first Control Display Unit (CDU) taxi at sea, Dec. 9. The CDU is an arm-mounted remote control unit which UCAS deck operators use to drive and fly the aircraft. Additionally the team completed other tests using the CDU including deck operator control handoffs, maneuvering tests, and transits across the arresting wires.

“With tremendous enthusiasm, the entire crew was extremely excited to be a part of this testing,” said Capt. S. Robert Roth, CVN 75 commanding officer. “There was obvious curiosity about the aircraft and pride to be part of Naval aviation history. These tests were the perfect match of a crew that knows the environment and the operation of aircraft at sea and a team with impressive new technologies.”

The X-47B concluded its flight deck taxi tests, deck operator hand-off tests, and flight deck capability tests Dec. 15, prior to Truman’s return to Norfolk. AV-2 will return to Patuxent River, Md. by barge in the next week.

In the coming months, two X-47B aircraft are scheduled to demonstrate arrested landing at the shore-based facility here. Additional carrier demonstrations are planned in the spring/summer 2013 timeframe based on ship availability.

The Navy UCAS program is intended to identify and reduce technical risks associated with developing potential future unmanned, carrier-compatible systems. It is an essential first step toward full-scale development of a carrier- suitable unmanned ISR/strike platform.

The X-47B concluded its flight deck taxi tests, deck operator hand-off tests, and flight deck capability tests Dec. 15, prior to Truman’s return to No ...

-

121211-N-ZZ999-102 ATLANTIC OCEAN (Dec. 11, 2012) An X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System (UCAS) demonstrator aircraft is transported on an aircraft elevator aboard the aircraft carrier Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Northrop Grumman by Alan Radecki/Released)

-

The X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System (UCAS) demonstrator taxies on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Harry S. Trum ...

-

Quelle; US-NAVY


3230 Views

Sonntag, 30. Dezember 2012 - 12:30 Uhr

Mars-Curiosity-Chroniken - Curiosity-News Sol 137

.

Looking Back at Entry Into 'Yellowknife Bay'

The NASA Mars rover Curiosity used its left Navigation Camera to record this view of the step down into a shallow depression called "Yellowknife Bay." It took the image on the 125th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (Dec. 12, 2012), just after finishing that sol's drive. The Sol 125 drive entered Yellowknife Bay and covered about 86 feet (26.1 meters). The descent into the basin crossed a step about 2 feet (half a meter) high, visible in the upper half of this image.

-

Curiosity Traverse Map, Sol 130

This map traces where NASA's Mars rover Curiosity drove between landing at a site subsequently named "Bradbury Landing," and the position reached during the mission's 130th Martian day, or sol, (Dec. 17, 2012). The inset shows the most recent legs of the traverse in greater detail. The rover entered a shallow depression called "Yellowknife Bay" with a drive of about 86 feet (26.1 meters) on Sol 125 (Dec. 12). It subsequently drove about 108 feet (32.8 meters) on Sol 127 (Dec. 14) and about 18 feet (5.6 meters) on Sol 130. Yellowknife Bay is a potential location for selection of the first target rock for Curiosity's hammering drill. The ground in this basin is a different type of terrain from the terrain Curiosity crossed getting there from Bradbury Landing. Nighttime observations from orbit indicate that the ground in the basin retains daytime heating better than the terrain around Bradbury Landing does, a property called high thermal inertia. The mapped area is within Gale Crater and north of the mountain called Mount Sharp in the middle of the crater. After the first use of the drill, the rover's main science destination will be on the lower reaches of Mount Sharp.The base image from the map is from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment Camera (HiRISE) in NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

-

At Edge of 'Yellowknife Bay,' Sol 130

In a shallow depression called "Yellowknife Bay," the NASA Mars rover Curiosity drove to an edge of the feature during the 130th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (Dec. 17, 2012) and used its Navigation Camera to record this view of the ledge at the margin and a view across the "bay." NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Science Laboratory mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The mission's Curiosity rover was designed, developed and assembled at JPL.

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 16:53:12 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 16:55:06 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 16:55:44 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 16:57:38 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Left (MAST_LEFT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 16:58:44 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 17:02:11 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 17:02:50 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 17:04:47 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 17:05:26 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 17:12:03 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Left (MAST_LEFT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 17:13:59 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 17:14:19 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 17:22:59 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 17:30:21 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 17:34:59 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Left (MAST_LEFT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 17:49:48 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 17:51:52 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Left (MAST_LEFT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 23:02:15 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Left (MAST_LEFT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 23:06:59 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Left (MAST_LEFT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 23:11:41 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Left (MAST_LEFT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 137 (2012-12-24 23:32:02 UTC) .

-


3319 Views

Samstag, 29. Dezember 2012 - 23:42 Uhr

Astronomie - Spiral Galaxy NGC 3627

.

Spiral Galaxy NGC 3627

The spiral galaxy NGC 3627 is located about 30 million light years from Earth. This composite image includes X-ray data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory (blue), infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope (red), and optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Very Large Telescope (yellow). The inset shows the central region, which contains a bright X-ray source that is likely powered by material falling onto a supermassive black hole.

A search using archival data from previous Chandra observations of a sample of 62 nearby galaxies has shown that 37 of the galaxies, including NGC 3627, contain X-ray sources in their centers. Most of these sources are likely powered by central supermassive black holes. The survey, which also used data from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey, found that seven of the 37 sources are new supermassive black hole candidates.

Confirming previous Chandra results, this study finds the fraction of galaxies found to be hosting supermassive black holes is much higher than found with optical searches. This shows the ability of X-ray observations to find black holes in galaxies where relatively low-level black hole activity has either been hidden by obscuring material or washed out by the bright optical light of the galaxy.

-

Quelle: NASA


3301 Views

Samstag, 29. Dezember 2012 - 23:05 Uhr

Astronomie - Russische Wissenschaftler haben Zugriff bekommen auf die Daten des SDO-Sonnenobservatorium (NASA)

.

The SDO project is a part of the NASA program "Living With the Star" (LWS), aimed at studying solar-terrestrial relations, that is, the mechanisms through which the Sun's activity changes the situation on the Earth; and it is also a part of its "extended", international version - ILWS, which includes spacecrafts of different countries. The CORONAS-Photon was a part of the ILWS, too.

-

Russian scientists have gained access to the data of the SDO solar observatory (NASA). The SDO Data Center is created in the Lebedev Physical Institute of the RAS. After the untimely breakdown of the CORONAS-Photon solar observatory at the end of 2009, Russia has not gotten its own solar research satellites, and the next project in this area, Intergelio-Zond, is expected to be carried out only after 2015.

NASA's SDO (Solar Dynamics Observatory) project has been working in the geosynchronous orbit since February, 2010. The task of the scientific complex consisting of three devices on board the satellite was almost constant observation of the Sun in a wide range of wavelengths, as well as the monitoring of changes that are happening to our star (hence the name of the project).

About a year after the launch of the observatory in April, 2011, Roscosmos and NASA signed an agreement on cooperation in heliophysics. According to it, the Russian Space Agency undertook the task of giving NASA the data archive from the Russian CORONAS-Photon solar Observatory, which operated from January to December 2009 (the actual period of obtaining scientific data was even less). In exchange, NASA was to provide Russian specialists with access to the SDO's information in the real-time operation mode.

The CORONAS-Photon worked in orbit for less than a year; at the end of 2009 the observatory went out of operation due to defects in the power supply system. It was the third spacecraft of the CORONAS series of solar observatories and up to now, the last Russian space project connected with the study of the Sun.

According to the plan, it was to operate during the period of the Sun's going out of the protracted minimum activity, but in reality it turned out that the spacecraft collected very little of the data. This archive was handed to NASA about six months ago reports Sergey Bogachev, researcher of the laboratory of x-ray astronomy of the Sun of the LPI RAS.

In exchange for this data, researchers of the LPI RAS got access to all the data of the SDO Observatory without a prior request in the real-time operation mode. Sergey Bogachev emphasizes that the LPI RAS must not only receive the data, but also facilitate their spreading through the Russian SDO center (web-site of the Russian centre - http://sdo.lebedev.ru). The agreement between the agencies provides that the Russian center will enjoy this support during the whole period of the Observatory's work, that is, at least up to 2015, and possibly longer, if it is decided to extend the mission.

The SDO project is a part of the NASA program "Living With the Star" (LWS), aimed at studying solar-terrestrial relations, that is, the mechanisms through which the Sun's activity changes the situation on the Earth; and it is also a part of its "extended", international version - ILWS, which includes spacecrafts of different countries. The CORONAS-Photon was a part of the ILWS, too.

The launch of the next Russian space project related to the research of the Sun is scheduled for 2015 at the earliest. This will be the Intergelio-Zond spacecraft, which has two important tasks: to approach the Sun at a distance of about 40 solar radii (about 27 million km; for comparison, in the closest point of its orbit, Mercury is at approximately 46 million km distance from the Sun) and "to have a look" at the polar areas of the Sun (by means of the inclination of the orbit) - until now this was done only by the Ulysses spacecraft (NASA).

The leading organizations of the project are the Pushkov Institute of Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Waves Propagation of the RAS and Lavochkin Research and Production Association. today, the project is in the initial stage of experimental-design work. After the approval of the draft project by the scientific-technical Council of the Federal Space Agency Roscosmos, it was agreed to consider the possibility of creating two spacecrafts in order to increase the mission's reliability and extend the scientific programme.

The next solar project, "Polar-ecliptical patrol", provides for the placing of two spacecraft into orbits, located at an angle to the plane of the ecliptic, to watch the Sun at "unusual" angles. As opposed to Intergelio-Zond, these spacecrafts will be placed only halfway from the Earth to the Sun. However, the precise terms of realization of this mission are still not determined.

The break in the solar and magnetospheric studies is uncharacteristic for the Russian space program: even in the 1990s, spacecrafts of the Interbol project and the CORONAS series were working in this field.

In fact, today, only the Plasma-F instrument complex is functioning aboard the Spektr-R observatory and the Resonance multi-satellite project, designed for the study of processes in the Earth's magnetosphere, is getting ready for launch in 2014. They are also included in the ILWS program. However, in the next few years there will be no Russian solar observatories, therefore, the agreement on the use of the SDO data is particularly interesting.


3255 Views

Samstag, 29. Dezember 2012 - 22:56 Uhr

Astronomie - Chinesische Wissenschaftler finden Hinweise auf Schwerkraft-Geschwindigkeit

-

Chinese scientists revealed Wednesday that they have found evidence supporting the hypothesis that gravity travels at the speed of light based on data gleaned from observing Earth tides.

Scientists have been trying to measure the speed of gravity for years through experiments and observations, but few have found valid methods.

By conducting six observations of total and annular solar eclipses, as well as Earth tides, a team headed by Tang Keyun, a researcher with the Institute of Geology and Geophysics under the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), found that the Newtonian Earth tide formula includes a factor related to the propagation of gravity.

"Earth tide" refers to a small change in the Earth's surface caused by the gravity of the moon and sun.

Based on the data, the team, with the participation of the China Earthquake Administration and the University of the CAS, found that gravitational force released from the sun and gravitational force recorded at ground stations on Earth did not travel at the same speed, with the time difference exactly the same as the time it takes for light to travel from the sun to observation stations on Earth.

The scientists admitted that the observation stations are located near oceans, indicating that the influence of ocean tides might have been strong enough to interfere with the results.

Consequently, the team conducted separate observations of Earth tides from two stations in Tibet and Xinjiang, two inland regions that are far away from all four oceans, as well as took measures to filter out other potential disturbances.

By applying the new data to the propagation equation of gravity, the team found that the speed of gravity is about 0.93 to 1.05 times the speed of light with a relative error of about 5 percent, providing the first set of strong evidence showing that gravity travels at the speed of light.

Their findings have been published online in English by German science and technology publishing group Springer.

Printed articles in both Chinese and English will be carried in a January 2013 edition of the Chinese Science Bulletin, according to the CAS Institute of Geology and Geophysics.


3215 Views

Samstag, 29. Dezember 2012 - 16:15 Uhr

Raumfahrt - Südkorea findet weitere Trägerstufe von Nordkorea-Unha-3-Rakete

.

South Korea has retrieved what appears to be part of the engine from North Korea's long-range rocket launched earlier this month, a finding that could provide clues to the communist nation's rocket technologies, a military source said Friday.

"We recovered an object believed to be the engine debris of North Korea's long-range rocket last night from the bottom of the sea about 160 kilometers off" the western port city of Gunsan, the source said. "It appears to have been damaged a lot from the shock at the time of the crash."

North Korea successfully launched the Unha-3 rocket on Dec. 12 and put a satellite into orbit, fueling concerns Pyongyang is closer to developing intercontinental ballistic missiles capable of carrying nuclear weapons as far as the mainland U.S.


3291 Views

Samstag, 29. Dezember 2012 - 10:15 Uhr

Mars-Curiosity-Chroniken - Curiosity-News Sol 136

.

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 136 (2012-12-23 17:08:05 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 136 (2012-12-23 17:09:21 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 136 (2012-12-23 17:11:15 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Left (MAST_LEFT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 136 (2012-12-23 17:12:20 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 136 (2012-12-23 17:13:08 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 136 (2012-12-23 17:18:50 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 136 (2012-12-23 17:19:27 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 136 (2012-12-23 17:22:30 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 136 (2012-12-23 17:27:16 UTC) .

-

This image was taken by Front Hazcam: Left A (FHAZ_LEFT_A) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 136 (2012-12-23 17:28:05 UTC) .

-

Fotos: NASA


3577 Views

Freitag, 28. Dezember 2012 - 16:50 Uhr

Raumfahrt - Saturn-Mond Rhea im Focus von Cassini

.

This raw, unprocessed image of Rhea was taken on December 22, 2012 and received on Earth December 23, 2012. The camera was pointing toward Rhea at approximately 27045 kilometers away, and the image was taken using the CL1 and CL2 filters. The image has not been validated or calibrated. A validated/calibrated image will be archived with the Planetary Data System in 2013.

The Cassini Solstice Mission is a joint United States and European endeavor. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter was designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging team consists of scientists from the US, England, France, and Germany. The imaging operations center and team lead (Dr. C. Porco) are based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.
-
This raw, unprocessed image of Rhea was taken on December 22, 2012 and received on Earth December 24, 2012. The camera was pointing toward Rhea at approximately 23097 kilometers away, and the image was taken using the CL1 and CL2 filters. The image has not been validated or calibrated. A validated/calibrated image will be archived with the Planetary Data System in 2013.
-
This raw, unprocessed image of Rhea was taken on December 22, 2012 and received on Earth December 23, 2012. The camera was pointing toward Rhea at approximately 27939 kilometers away, and the image was taken using the CL1 and CL2 filters. The image has not been validated or calibrated. A validated/calibrated image will be archived with the Planetary Data System in 2013.
-
This raw, unprocessed image of Rhea was taken on December 22, 2012 and received on Earth December 24, 2012. The camera was pointing toward Rhea at approximately 25473 kilometers away, and the image was taken using the CL1 and CL2 filters. The image has not been validated or calibrated. A validated/calibrated image will be archived with the Planetary Data System in 2013.
-
This raw, unprocessed image of Rhea was taken on December 22, 2012 and received on Earth December 24, 2012. The camera was pointing toward Rhea at approximately 22934 kilometers away, and the image was taken using the CL1 and CL2 filters. The image has not been validated or calibrated. A validated/calibrated image will be archived with the Planetary Data System in 2013.
-
This raw, unprocessed image of Rhea was taken on December 22, 2012 and received on Earth December 24, 2012. The camera was pointing toward Rhea at approximately 26576 kilometers away, and the image was taken using the CL1 and CL2 filters. The image has not been validated or calibrated. A validated/calibrated image will be archived with the Planetary Data System in 2013.
-
This raw, unprocessed image of Rhea was taken on December 22, 2012 and received on Earth December 23, 2012. The camera was pointing toward Rhea at approximately 29909 kilometers away, and the image was taken using the CL1 and VIO filters. The image has not been validated or calibrated. A validated/calibrated image will be archived with the Planetary Data System in 2013.
-
This raw, unprocessed image of Rhea was taken on December 23, 2012 and received on Earth December 24, 2012. The camera was pointing toward Rhea at approximately 55343 kilometers away, and the image was taken using the CL1 and CL2 filters. The image has not been validated or calibrated. A validated/calibrated image will be archived with the Planetary Data System in 2013.
-
This raw, unprocessed image of Rhea was taken on December 22, 2012 and received on Earth December 24, 2012. The camera was pointing toward Rhea at approximately 30386 kilometers away, and the image was taken using the CL1 and CL2 filters. The image has not been validated or calibrated. A validated/calibrated image will be archived with the Planetary Data System in 2013.
-
Fotos: NASA

3341 Views

Freitag, 28. Dezember 2012 - 14:20 Uhr

Raumfahrt - "Urgestein der Raumfahrt" Jesco von Puttkamer verstorben

.

Er hat uns den Mond und das Weltall erklärt wie kein Zweiter. Jetzt ist er tot. Der deutsch-amerikanische Luftfahrtingenieur und Publizist Jesco von Puttkamer ist am Donnerstag im Alter von 79 Jahren gestorben.

„Jesco starb zu Hause. Er litt in der vergangenen Woche unter Grippesymptomen“, zitiert der Online-Dienst „NASA Watch“ aus einer internen NASA-Memo. „Sein Tod trifft uns völlig unvorbereitet. Wir sind geschockt und werden ihn vermissen. Wir haben einen großartigen Mitarbeiter und Repräsentanten verloren.“

Von Puttkamer stand bis zu seinem Tod im Dienst der NASA, arbeitete zuletzt unter anderem maßgeblich an der Planung der Internationalen Raumstation ISS und langfristigen US-Raumfahrtprogrammen mit.

►1962 war der gebürtige Leipziger nach einem Maschinenbaustudium an der Technischen Hochschule Aachen in die USA ausgewandert. Dort arbeitete er im Team von Wernher von Braun in Huntsville (Alabama) am Apollo-Mond-Programm mit.

►1969 ging ein Menschheitstraum in Erfüllung: Die US-Astronauten Neil Armstrong und Buzz Aldrin betraten als erste Menschen den Mond. Jesco von Puttkamer war Mitglied im Apollo-Bodenteam.

►Ab 1974 leitete von Puttkamer im NASA-Hauptquartier in Washington D. C. eine Arbeitsgruppe für strategische Planung.

Jesco von Puttkamer machte sich auch als Fachbuchautor und Publizist einen Namen. Aus seiner Feder stammen eine ganze Reihe von Werken unter anderem zum Mond und zum Mars.

Außerdem schrieb er mehrere Science Fiction-Romane und arbeitete für den ersten Star Trek-Film als technischer Berater.

SF von 1957

-

...und im Oktober 2012 war er noch in unserer Sternwarte in Heppenheim:

HEPPENHEIM. Jesco von Puttkamer kommt nach Heppenheim. Auf Einladung der Starkenburg-Sternwarte referiert der NASA-Ingenieur am Montag (8.) im Kurfürstensaal. "Menschheitstraum Raumfahrt" lautet das Thema.
Das neue Vortragsprogramm der Starkenburg-Sternwarte startet in diesem Jahr später als geplant, dafür aber mit einem Paukenschlag: Später, weil die Räume auf dem Schlossberg saniert werden - mit einem Paukenschlag, weil es dem Verein gelungen ist, Jesco von Puttkamer nach Heppenheim zu holen.
Der deutsch-amerikanischer NASA-Ingenieur Professor Dr. h. c. Diplom-Ingenieur Jesco Freiherr Jesco von Puttkamer (Bild) - so der offizielle Titel des Mannes - referiert ab 20 Uhr im Kurfürstensaal des Amtshofes.
Augenzeugenbericht
Sein Bildervortrag ist ein Augenzeugenbericht zur Entwicklung der bemannten Raumfahrt: die US-amerikanischen Apollo-Mondlandungen, die Space Shuttles, die russische Raumfahrt und letztendlich der gemeinsame Bau der Internationalen Raumstation ISS.
"Wir halten von Puttkamer für einen verdienten Mann der Raumfahrt", sagt Rainer Kresken, seit 2007 Vorsitzender des Vereins und Leiter der Sternwarte und erklärt, wie die Verbindung zu dem bekannten Ingenieur zustande kam: "Die Suche nach Kleinplaneten ist ein wesentlicher Teil unserer Arbeit auf der Sternwarte." 2009 sei er mit Freund und Vereins-Geschäftsführer Matthias Busch auf Teneriffa gewesen, im Gepäck ein Teleskop von der ESA in Darmstadt. "Damit haben wir einen neuen Kleinplaneten entdeckt und ihn nach Puttkamer benannt", sagt Kresken. Die Mitteilung darüber habe den NASA-Ingenieur so gerührt, dass er sich dazu bereiterklärt hat, einen Vortrag in Heppenheim zu halten.
Freier Eintritt in Kurfürstensaal
Jesco von Puttkamer war 1962 von dem berühmten deutsch-US-amerikanischen Raketenkonstrukteur Wernher von Braun in das Apollo-Programm geholt worden: "Kommen Sie zu uns, wir fliegen zum Mond!" Von Puttkammer nahm das Angebot an und berechnete die Flugbahnen für die Apollo-Mond-Mission. Danach arbeitete der Ingenieur an NASA-Missionen wie dem Skylab und dem Space Shuttle, heute hat er eine leitende Position im Programm der Internationalen Raumstation ISS und den Mond- und Marsmissionen.
In Deutschland ist von Puttkamer vor allem als Autor für Raumfahrt-Sachbücher und aus den Medien bekannt, in jüngeren Jahren schrieb er auch Science-Fiction-Romane und war technischer Berater für die Science-Fiction-Serie Star Trek.
Der Eintritt zu der Veranstaltung ist frei. Der Verein Starkenburg-Sternwarte erhebt generell keine Gebühren für Vorträge oder Beobachtungsabende. Dabei soll es auch in Zukunft bleiben. "Wir möchten auch finanziell schlechter gestellten Menschen ermöglichen, an unseren Veranstaltungen teilzunehmen", erklärt Kresken. schu
Quelle: Bergsträßer Anzeiger, Samstag, 06.10.2012

 


3476 Views

Freitag, 28. Dezember 2012 - 10:45 Uhr

Astronomie - NASA-BLAST-Forschungsballon in der Antarktis gestartet

.26.12.2012

NASA's balloon-carried BLAST sub-millimeter telescope is hoisted into launch position on Dec. 25, 2012, at McMurdo Station in Antarctica on a mission to peer into the cosmos.
CREDIT: NASA/Wallops Flight Facility

-

A giant helium balloon is slowly drifting above Antarctica, about 22 miles (36 kilometers) up. Launched on Tuesday (Dec. 25) from the National Science Foundation's Long Duration Balloon (LDB) facility on Earth's southernmost continent, it carries a sensitive telescope that measures submillimeter light waves from stellar nurseries in our Milky Way.

"Christmas launch!" wrote officials with NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, which oversees the agency's balloon research program, in a Twitter post yesterday. "BLAST launched today from McMurdo Station, Antarctica."

This is the fifth and final mission for BLAST, short for the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope, and mission designers hope it will reveal why so few stars are born in our galaxy.

-

Update: 28.12.2012

NASA and the National Science Foundation launched a scientific balloon on Monday, Dec. 20, to study the effects of cosmic rays on Earth. It was the first of five scientific balloons scheduled to launch from Antarctica in December.

The Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM VI) experiment was designed and built at the University of Maryland. CREAM VI is investigating high-energy cosmic-ray particles that originated from distant supernovae explosions in the Milky Way and reached Earth.

Currently, CREAM VI is floating at 126,000 feet above Antarctica with nominal science operations.

Two smaller, hand-launched space science payloads have already been launched, flown, and successfully flight terminated. They carried the Balloon Array for Radiation-belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) experiment designed and constructed at Dartmouth College. BARREL will provide answers on how and where Earth's Van Allen radiation belts, which produce the polar aurora, periodically interact with Earth's upper atmosphere. These test flights will help scientists prepare for similar flight experiments scheduled for launch in 2013 and 2014.

Next in line will be an experiment from the University of Pennsylvania called the Balloon Borne Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST). This experiment will investigate how magnetic fields impede star formation in our galaxy. BLAST's instrumentation and telescope will collect data to make the first high-resolution images of magnetically polarized dust in a number of nearby star forming regions.  

A super-pressure balloon test flight also will be conducted. The 14-million-cubic-foot NASA balloon is the largest single-cell, fully-sealed, super-pressure structure ever flown. It is twice the size of a similar balloon flown over Antarctica for 54 days from December 2008 to February 2009. NASA's goal is to eventually develop a 26-million cubic-foot super-pressure balloon, nearly the size of a football stadium.

NASA scientific balloons are composed of a lightweight polyethylene film, similar to sandwich wrap. Flying to altitudes of nearly 25 miles, the balloons carry payloads weighing up to 6,000 pounds.

During part of each Antarctic summer, from December to February, NASA and the National Science Foundation conduct a scientific balloon campaign.  Two unique geophysical conditions above Antarctica make long-duration balloon flights circumnavigating the continent possible during the three-month period.

A nearly circular pattern of gentle east-to-west winds that lasts for a few weeks allows the recovery of a balloon from roughly the same geographic location from which it was launched and permits a flight path that is almost entirely above land. Balloons are illuminated continuously because the sun never sets during the Antarctic summer. And balloons maintain a constant temperature and altitude, which increases and stabilizes observation times. By contrast, in other areas of the world, daily heating and cooling cycles change the volume of gas in the balloon and cause it to rise and fall, severely limiting fly times.

NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia manages the scientific balloon program for the agency's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. Under NASA safety supervision, the launch operations are conducted by the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility in Palestine, Texas, which is managed by the Physical Science Laboratory of New Mexico State University. The National Science Foundation manages the U.S. Antarctic Program and provides logistic support for all U.S. scientific operations in Antarctica.


-
Frams: NASA-Ballon-Start-Video
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Quelle: NASA

3567 Views


Weitere 10 Nachrichten nachladen...