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Sonntag, 23. August 2015 - 21:23 Uhr

Astronomie-History - 1949: Radio Teleskope schaffen neue Wissenschaft

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Aus dem CENAP-Archiv:

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Quelle: CENAP-Archiv


Tags: Astronomie 

1413 Views

Sonntag, 23. August 2015 - 21:00 Uhr

Astronomie - UCLA Physiker testet Theorien der dunklen Energie durch Nachahmung des Weltraum-Vakuums

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Scientist uses cold atoms to probe dark energy, which is responsible for the acceleration of the universe

Besides the atoms that make up our bodies and all of the objects we encounter in everyday life, the universe also contains mysterious dark matter and dark energy. The latter, which causes galaxies to accelerate away from one another, constitutes the majority of the universe’s energy and mass.
Ever since dark energy was discovered in 1998, scientists have been proposing theories to explain it — one is that dark energy produces a force that can be measured only where space has a very low density, like the regions between galaxies.
Paul Hamilton, a UCLA assistant professor of physics and astronomy, reproduced the low-density conditions of space to precisely measure this force. His findings, which helped to reveal how strongly dark energy interacts with normal matter, appear Aug. 21 in the online edition of the journal Science.
Hamilton’s research focuses on the search for specific types of dark energy fields known as “chameleon fields,” which exhibit a force whose strength depends on the density of their surrounding environment. This force, if it were proven to exist, would be an example of a so-called “fifth force” beyond the four known forces of gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong and weak forces acting within atoms.
But this fifth force has never been detected in laboratory experiments, which prompted physicists to propose that when chameleon fields are in dense regions of space — for example, the Earth’s atmosphere — they shrink so dramatically that they become immeasurable.
Chameleon fields were first hypothesized in 2004 by Justin Khoury, a University of Pennsylvania physicist and co-author of the Science paper, but it wasn’t until 2014 that English physicist Clare Burrage and colleagues proposed a methodology for testing their existence in a laboratory using atoms.
At the time, Hamilton was a postdoctoral researcher in the UC Berkeley laboratory of Holger Müller. His team already had a head start on investigating chameleon fields: They had independently developed an experiment using atoms to measure small forces.
Detecting the force of chameleon fields requires replicating the vacuum of space, Hamilton explained, because when they are near mass, the fields essentially hide. So the physicists built a vacuum chamber, roughly the size of a soccer ball, in which the pressure was one-trillionth that of the atmosphere we normally breathe. The researchers inserted atoms of cesium, a soft metal, into the vacuum chamber to detect forces.
“Atoms are the perfect test particles; they don’t weigh very much and they’re very small,” Hamilton said.
They also added to the vacuum chamber an aluminum sphere roughly the size of a marble, which functioned as a dense object to suppress the chameleon fields and allow the researchers to measure small forces. The atoms were then cooled to within 10 one-millionths of a degree above absolute zero, in order to keep them still enough for the scientists to perform the experiment.
Hamilton and his team collected data by shining a near-infrared laser into the vacuum chamber and measuring how the cesium atoms accelerated due to gravity and, potentially, another force.
“We used a light wave as a ruler to measure the acceleration of atoms,” Hamilton said.
This measurement was performed twice: once when the aluminum sphere was close to the atoms and once when it was farther away. According to scientific theory, chameleon fields would cause the atoms to accelerate differently depending on how far away the sphere was.
The researchers found no difference in the acceleration of the cesium atoms when they changed the location of the aluminum sphere. As a result, the researchers now have a better understanding of how strongly chameleon fields can interact with normal matter, but Hamilton will continue to use cold atoms to investigate theories of dark energy. His next experiment will aim to detect other possible forms of dark energy that cause forces that change with time.
The study’s co-authors were Müller, postdoctoral researcher Philipp Haslinger, graduate student Matt Jaffe and undergraduate Quinn Simmons, all of UC Berkeley.
The research was supported by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, DARPA, the National Science Foundation, NASA and the Austrian Science Fund.
Quelle: UCLA

Tags: Astronomie 

1590 Views

Sonntag, 23. August 2015 - 19:46 Uhr

Raumfahrt - Blick in den HTV-Foto-Album von JAXA

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HTV-4 ReEntry

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Quelle: JAXA


Tags: Raumfahrt 

1593 Views

Samstag, 22. August 2015 - 15:47 Uhr

Astronomie - Hat Saturn-Mond Enceladus ein Haufen von Geröll und Eis in seinem Kern?

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Saturn's moon, Enceladus, may not have a heart of stone—at least, not completely. A new model suggests the satellite has a rubble-filled pile of boulders and ice at its core, rather than a more conventional solid stone center. This “fluffy core” could help solve the mystery of the moon’s underground ocean. A watery layer beneath Enceladus’s crust has long been suspected to exist because of the constant eruption of geysers at its southern pole. But scientists have said that any such ocean should have frozen over the lifetime of the Saturn system. Tidal heating that warms the insides of moons and planets in orbit would simply not be enough to keep this ocean in a liquid state if Enceladus had a solid core. And antifreezing agents such as ammonia would eventually separate from the water if they were present in large enough amounts to prevent ice from forming. But this new model makes antifreeze irrelevant while resurrecting the tidal heating hypothesis: A heart of rubble would flex more easily with the tidal pull of Saturn, emitting enough heat to maintain a liquid layer. And scientists say this is perfectly plausible. If temperatures never climbed high enough to melt the boulders and pebbles at the moon's heart into a single, solid core, it would have remained a rocky rubble pile, extending the liquid lifetime of Enceladus’s underground ocean.

Quelle: AAAS


Tags: Astronomie 

1690 Views

Samstag, 22. August 2015 - 15:30 Uhr

Astronomie - ISS beobachtet SPRITES am Rande zum Weltraum

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17.08.2015

SPRITES AT THE EDGE OF SPACE: We all know what comes out of the bottom of thunderclouds: lightning. But rarely do we see what comes out of the top. On August 10th, astronauts onboard the International Space Station were perfectly positioned to observe red sprites dancing atop a cluster of storms in Mexico. They snapped this incredible photo:

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This shows just how high sprites can go. The photo shows their red forms reaching all the way from the thunderstorm below to a layer of green airglow some 100 km above Earth's surface. This means sprites touch the edge of space, alongside auroras, meteors and noctilucent clouds. They are a true space weather phenomenon.
Although sprites have been seen for at least a century, most scientists did not believe they existed until after 1989 when sprites were photographed by cameras onboard the space shuttle. Now "sprite chasers" regularly photograph the upward bolts from their own homes. Give it a try!
Quelle: Spaceweather
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Update: 22.08.2015
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SPRITES AND TROLLS AT THE EDGE OF SPACE: We all know what comes out of the bottom of thunderclouds: lightning. But rarely do we see what comes out of the top. On August 10th, astronauts onboard the International Space Station were perfectly positioned to observe red sprites dancing atop a cluster of storms in Mexico. They snapped this incredible photo:
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This shows just how high sprites can go. The photo shows their red forms reaching all the way from the thunderstorm below to a layer of green airglow some 100 km above Earth's surface. This means sprites touch the edge of space, alongside auroras, meteors and noctilucent clouds. They are a true space weather phenomenon.
A few minutes after the astronauts saw the sprites, they spotted a related creature--a "Troll." It jumped up to the left of the sprites:
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"Trolls are also known as 'secondary transient luminous events," explains Oscar van der Velde, a member of the Lightning Research Group at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya. "They are occasionally observed alongside big clusters of sprites, and they can reach 40-60 km high."
Van der Velde says that sprites can actually pull Earth's ionosphere down toward the thunderstorm. When the gap shrinks, and the local electric field intensifies, Trolls appear.
You don't have to be onboard a spaceship to see these exotic forms of lightning. "Sprite chasers" regularly photograph the upward bolts from their own homes. Van der Velde has photographed Trolls from ground-level, too. "I recorded these trolls last October over a storm over the Mediterranean Sea west of Sardinia and Corsica," he says. Browse the sprite gallery for more examples.
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Quelle: spaceweather

Tags: Astronomie 

1720 Views

Samstag, 22. August 2015 - 13:40 Uhr

Raumfahrt-History - 1976: Soyuz 21

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Aus dem CENAP-Archiv:

Quelle: CENAP-Archiv


Tags: Raumfahrt 

1456 Views

Samstag, 22. August 2015 - 13:19 Uhr

Raumfahrt - Die Zukunft des Bauens im All

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Is the International Space Station the last aluminum spacecraft?

Robert T. Bigelow has developed the inflatable Bigelow Expanded Activity Module, an aluminum habitation, to test in space. Pictured is a one-third scale model. (NASA)
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Late this year or early next, NASA will build an addition to the International Space Station, increasing the orbital laboratory’s size from eight rooms to nine. The new room is like no other on the station, and will be very easy to construct: Just connect to a docking port, fill with compressed air, and voilà! Instant space habitat.
The hard part was the 15 years of re­search and development that Bigelow Aerospace in North Las Vegas needed to create the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, or BEAM. Initially scheduled for a September launch, BEAM’s test deployment is now delayed due to the post-launch explosion of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket bound for the ISS on June 28 — and no one yet knows how long that delay will be. Once BEAM does reach its destination, it will undergo two years of intensive testing, a trial run for a technology that could play a significant role in future human spaceflight and low-Earth-orbit commercial ventures: inflatable spacecraft.
Bigelow’s inflatable is, in a sense, the resurrection of a canceled NASA program. In the 1990s, NASA developed TransHab, or Transit Habitat, an inflatable living area to test in space with the goal of using such a container to transport humans to Mars and to replace the International Space Station’s aluminum habitation module. TransHab got only as far as ground testing before Congress cut the program’s funding in 2000. Real estate billionaire and space enthusiast Robert T. Bigelow purchased the rights to the patents that NASA filed for the technology.
Bigelow Aerospace picked up where TransHab left off, advancing research and development and eventually putting two inflatable test modules—Genesis I and II—into orbit in 2006 and 2007. Both modules, each the size of a van, remain in orbit today. Their batteries ran out years ago; eventually they’ll reenter the atmosphere and burn up. But they served their purpose. “Genesis I and II validated our basic architecture,” says Mike Gold, Bigelow’s Director of Washington, D.C. Operations & Business Growth. “From a technical perspective, these spacecraft showed that expandable systems could survive the rigors of launch, that our deployment process would work, and that we could successfully integrate windows into an expandable habitat structure.”
Inflatable habitats in space have advantages over conventional metal structures. First, they’re a lot cheaper to get into orbit. One reason is weight: BEAM, designed to expand to 16 cubic meters, or about the size of a 10- by 12-foot room, weighs only 3,000 pounds at launch. Its density—that is, its mass divided by its volume—is 88 kilograms per cubic meter. By comparison, the density of the U.S. lab at the International Space Station, Destiny, is 137 kilograms per cubic meter. The ISS’s Tranquility module has a density of 194 kilograms per cubic meter.
Inflatables are also appealingly compact. Folded into its launch configuration, BEAM takes up a space five feet by seven feet. Gold cites BEAM’s modest cost— 17.8 million—as one of its key advantages over older technologies: “I can’t think of any other substantial hardware that has been done, or almost any other project that’s been done, for such a relatively minor amount of money,” he says.
Reducing the size and weight of the payload at launch is what saves taxpayers money. “You gain tremendously in terms of launch efficiency, and that’s the hardest, most expensive thing about space—getting out of Earth’s gravity well,” says George Zamka, a former shuttle astronaut who worked for the FAA’s Office of Commercial Space Transportation before joining Bigelow Aerospace last year.
Rajib Dasgupta, BEAM project manager for NASA, says inflatables are one concept that the space agency is studying for habitation inside cislunar space—the sphere formed by the moon’s orbit of Earth. “Successful BEAM demonstration on ISS will certainly be a giant stepping stone to future deep-space exploration habitats,” he says.
Inflation Evaluation
BEAM was scheduled to be launched by SpaceX CRS-8, a cargo resupply mission to the ISS intially scheduled for September 2, though it will now be delayed as a result of the SpaceX explosion. (Bigelow’s Gold will only say he remains hopeful that BEAM will reach the station “this calendar year.”) Once BEAM arrives, it will face two years of engineering tests. But its first hurdle maybe be simply overcoming negative associations with the word “inflatable.”
“People sometimes have a bad perception of inflatable structures because of their experience with low-cost, poorly made products such as pool toys that leak, or party balloons that burst,” says David Cadogan, director of engineering for ILC Dover in Frederica, Delaware, a firm that has worked with NASA for decades, developing spacesuits, airbags for the Mars rovers, and airbags for Boeing’s proposed Crew Space Transportation-100 vehicle. But every day we entrust our lives to inflatable structures: car tires and air bags, emergency escape slides in airplanes, angioplasty surgeries.
Of course, inflatable habitats have never housed human beings in space before. NASA and its contractors have half a century’s worth of experience with aluminum pressure vessels; they know how to assemble them in space, how to inspect and maintain them, how to analyze their structural loads, and how to control fractures in them. They also know aluminum’s tolerance of—and vulnerability to—impacts from micrometeoroids and orbital debris. Engineers have developed ways to monitor impacts, find leaks, analyze damage, and even make limited repairs.
Steve Stich, director of exploration, integration and science at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, says inflatable habitats may someday be integrated with metal pressure vessels, but the agency needs to learn a lot more about how inflatables hold up against the hazards of space: radiation exposure, thermal cycling, debris impact. For example, BEAM has a metal structure at the end that berths to the ISS—it’s known as a common berthing mechanism. Loading forces from the station will place stresses on BEAM, particularly where the berthing mechanism attaches to the station, and also where the berthing mechanism attaches to BEAM’s fabric shell.
No one yet knows whether inflatable habitats can safely dock to other spacecraft, and whether an airlock can be integrated into an inflatable habitat. Stich believes that for high-stress applications like docking, aluminum will likely remain: “I don’t see us totally ever phasing out metallic structures,” he says.
One challenge, Stich adds, is how to develop inflatables that can be outfitted with life support, crew quarters, and other systems prior to launch; if not, astronauts will have to set those up once the habitat is deployed in space. Conventional modules at the space station typically arrive with equipment already integrated into the structure.
George Studor, a retired NASA senior project engineer who now consults, through various contractors, for the NASA Engineering and Safety Center, says inflatable habitats face an uphill battle to win the kind of confidence NASA has in the metal ships it has been building for half a century.
“It takes heritage to have confidence in a technology,” Studor says. “Even if the inflatable Bigelow space station turns out really great, it doesn’t mean that there aren’t faults with that thing…. There haven’t been enough of them made. There hasn’t been enough materials experience and testing. It becomes a more risky space venture than what we would normally do. But because of its potential, NASA has been working with Bigelow for many years to help the technology mature.”
An Idea Nearly as Old as NASA
NASA first began studying the possibilities of inflatable structures around 1960, when researchers at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Virginia drew up plans for a doughnut-shaped space station. In another inflatables project, known as Echo, NASA launched giant Mylar-coated balloons into orbit in 1960 and 1964 and bounced radio signals off them. In 1965, the agency developed concepts for inflatable moon habitats, and in 1967 it studied the idea of an air-filled space station nicknamed Moby Dick, apparently due to its large dimensions.
TransHab emerged 30 years later as a project at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. The effort was led by William Schneider, who had worked on micrometeoroid protection for the space shuttle. Schneider had already retired when TransHab was canceled in 2000, but he has consulted with Bigelow Aerospace.
TransHab faced skepticism from the start. NASA’s Kriss Kennedy, a space architect who helped create the inflatable and coined the name, recalled in Air & Space (“Launch. Inflate. Insert Crew,” May, 1999) that during public talks he would pop a balloon to drive the point home that this is a balloon; inflatable structures are not. During the short-lived TransHab program, NASA engineers developed inflatable habitats with a foot-thick, 16-layer shell of foam and fabric that stood up to ballistics tests designed to simulate strikes by micrometeoroids and orbital debris.
The actual architecture of TransHab included three thin-film air bladders covered by alternating layers of ceramic fabric, polyurethane foam, and Kevlar. The ceramic fabric, called Nextel, was sandwiched by three-inch layers of foam.Together, the layers served to protect against micrometeoroids. The Kevlar webbing made up TransHab’s pressure-holding restraint layer, which was woven like a rug to reduce the number of seams and maximize strength. Inside TransHab, two-inch-thick walls surrounding bedrooms would be filled with water to shield crew members from radiation.
BEAM represents a generation of refinement to that earlier design. From inside to outside, says Dasgupta, it includes a bladder, restraint system, micrometeoroid/orbital debris protection, insulation, and an external thermal blanket. (BEAM’s precise makeup is proprietary.) Gold says BEAM’s “Kevlar-like” protective layers will measure up. “We have done side-by-side hyper-velocity impact testing with portions of the ISS’s [micrometeoroid/orbital debris protection] layers,” he says. “Our system offers equal if not superior protections to what’s on the ISS today.”
He pauses before choosing a dramatic example. “If you’re about to get shot, would you rather have aluminum in front of you or a Kevlar vest?”
Trial in Space
Once SpaceX’s uncrewed Dragon cargo spacecraft reaches the ISS, the station’s robotic arm will be used to attach BEAM to the aft section of the Node 3 module. With the hatch to the station closed, air tanks inside BEAM will pressurize the module. Inside, a telescoping structure will expand as BEAM inflates. Made of an aluminum alloy, the structure is designed to provide rigidity in case a micrometeoroid or piece of orbital debris penetrates the habitat, says Dasgupta.
The primary performance requirement for BEAM is to demonstrate that it can be launched, deploy on the ISS, inflate, and maintain long-term pressure without leakage. Another key objective is to determine how well an inflatable structure in low Earth orbit can protect astronauts from radiation. BEAM will be outfitted with radiation sensors, and data from them will be compared to corresponding data collected on the ISS aluminum modules. Solar flares pose an additional radiation risk.
Gold says BEAM should offer better radiation protection than metal: When metallic structures absorb radiation, the shielding material can itself emit “secondary radiation.” When high-energy particles smash into atoms in a spacecraft’s metallic shielding, the collisions produce a shower of nuclear byproducts—neutrons and other particles—that then enter the spacecraft. Secondary radiation can be more dangerous than the original radiation from space. “The non-metallic structure of the BEAM substantially reduces the secondary radiation effect that otherwise occurs within metallic structures,” Gold adds.
Once you’re beyond low Earth orbit and exposure to cosmic radiation increases, neither metallic nor fabric construction can fully protect astronauts—a longer-term concern as future astronauts travel to the moon, Mars, and beyond. “The only thing you could do there is provide a very massive dense material to absorb it, basically,” Zamka acknowledges. “It’s parts of atoms coming at you.”
Apart from the need to protect astronauts, the greatest engineering challenge for BEAM is likely maintaining structural integrity over time—specifically, avoiding a phenomenon known as “creep rupture,” says ILC Dover’s Cadogan. Creep rupture occurs when the constant loading of materials at high percentages of their ultimate strength leads to an elongation of the material, and eventual failure.
However, if you can design and test a structure so loading is kept below 25 percent of the materials’ ultimate strength (for most structural materials), creep rupture shouldn’t be a problem. Although some materials are more susceptible to this type of stress than others, all materials have some degree of susceptibility, says Cadogan. Good engineering can mitigate the problem. One familiar example? Window glass. Two hundred years ago, glass would sag over time—an effect of gravity. Modern materials design has solved this vulnerability.
Cadogan says that BEAM’s manufacturing challenges are even more daunting than its engineering challenges. For example, ILC Dover welds polymer-coated fabrics to create bladders that retain inflation gas. These seals are made by applying heat and pressure to the materials in a highly controlled process. “Then there are the sewing operations that are used to create the restraint—the part that goes over the bladder and supports all the pressurization and structural loads,” Cadogan says. “Sewing also has parameters that require control, including thread tension, needle sharpness, stitches per inch, etc….You just have to set up the machines correctly, have proficient operators, and inspect and test everything well before flight.”
At the end of BEAM’s two-year mission, its last test will be when the station’s robotic arm successfully jettisons it from the ISS. The robotic jettison of a large, 3,000-pound structure from the station has never been attempted. Once detached, BEAM is expected to enter the atmosphere and burn up within a year.
Room to Move
Inflatables offer another clear benefit: more habitable space. BEAM is relatively small, but an operational module that Bigelow is developing, called B330, will offer 330 cubic meters of habitable volume. The International Space Station contains 916 cubic meters of pressurized volume—only about three times that of a single B330 module.
As a rule, astronauts enjoy about double the volume of a similar space on Earth, because in micro-gravity they have access to the entire area, from ceiling to floor, and in any orientation. The space station is a massive structure—with its extended solar arrays, about the size of a football field. But thinking about the ISS in that way can be deceiving. “Inside, you don’t get all that,” Zamka says. “It’s small and constrained by whatever node you happen to be in, whether it’s Tranquility or Serenity or Unity…. You’re in this kind of tube-like existence.”
Inflatable modules would offer astronauts more space. “I think they’ll notice that difference, particularly if they look at this expanded volume for traveling on long missions in deep space,” says Zamka.
The current plan calls for crew members to enter BEAM once every three months, although that may change, says Dasgupta. Their job will be to collect sensor data, perform surface sampling, change out radiation area monitors, and inspect the general condition of the module. BEAM’s ventilation is passive; it takes air pushed from the station through a duct. Air circulation inside BEAM will help prevent condensation. The module has no windows, though future designs could conceivably accommodate them.
“No hard time limit has been established for crew ingress, but since the ISS crew is busy all year round conducting ISS research, we would like to limit crew ingress to a few hours,” Dasgupta says.
NASA doesn’t plan to stow any equipment or hardware inside BEAM, and the module will have no internal power. Inside, crew members will carry battery-operated lights.
BEAM could become popular with astronauts, not only because of the extra space but also because it should be relatively quiet compared with other modules. Gold says, “We believe the BEAM could be an oasis.”
Assuming BEAM performs well, Big­elow Aerospace envisions B330 modules used as stand-alone space stations for the private sector. Pharmaceutical and materials science firms, for example, could use B330 modules as laboratories for product development, says Gold. (He declines to say how the B330 modules will be priced.) The B330s accommodate six, and Bigelow hopes they will become integral to deep-space missions—crashpads to keep astronauts from being confined to a capsule, like NASA’s planned Orion spacecraft.
“Obviously there is not sufficient volume [with Orion alone] for long-duration missions,” says Gold. However, if “you attach a habitat to a propulsion system and/or capsule, you’ve got a pretty robust system for beyond-LEO exploration to the moon, Mars and beyond.”
In this respect, NASA’s shelved TransHab program is truly on the verge of being reborn. Zamka says the B330 perfectly complements NASA’s Orion spacecraft. “[Orion] is a transfer vehicle. It’s supposed to transfer astronauts from Earth to another place,” he says. “We’re that other place.”
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Concept illustration of BEAM docked to the ISS. Bigelow hopes the two-year test flight will demonstrate that space inflatables are versatile, economical, and safe. (Bigelow Aerospace)
Quelle: Air&Space

Tags: Raumfahrt 

1725 Views

Freitag, 21. August 2015 - 16:00 Uhr

UFO-Forschung - Aus der Fotoabteilung der UFO-Meldestelle

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Derzeit braucht sich unsere UFO-Meldestelle über Beobachtungsmeldungen nicht zu beklagen, reger Eingang über Emals und Tel-Anrufe, lassen die Recherchen laufen. So ist gerade in den letzten Wochen neben den Meldungen auch Foto- und Video-Material eingegangen, welche derzeit umfangreiche Nachforschungen erfordern und wir hier schon einmal die abgearbeiteten Fälle aufführen wollen.

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23.07.2015 - Hellinghausen

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Über das UFO-Meldestelle-Telefon meldeten sich zwei Zeugen welche gerade am Himmel einen "weißblauvioletten Stern"  sehen  würden und welchen sie schon geraume Zeit beobachten und auch fotografiert hätten und dieser sich durch seine Leuchtkraft von den anderen Sternen abheben würde. Hierzu wurde uns dieses nachfolgende Foto zugesandt:

Verwackelte Aufnahme der Zeugen von "weißblauvioletten Stern"

Auf Grund der Angaben der Zeugen, den Stern am Westhimmel zu sehen und in welcher Winkelhöhe, konnte LIVE die Ursache für die Beobachtung ausfindig gemacht werden und mit der nachfolgenden Astro-Karte belegt werden. Es handelte sich um den Stern Arcturus der sich zur Beobachtungszeit in der angegeben Himmelsrichtung befand:

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Identifizierung: Stern Arcturus

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2013 - Deutschland

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Über Email erreichte uns auch nachfolgende Kurz-Mail mit Foto-Anhang:

Nach dem wir das Foto begutachteten stellte es sich heraus, der Melder beim Fotografieren eine Sonnen-Reflexion in der Autoscheibe bekam, verursacht durch den Türholm, von welchem sich die Reflexion in der Scheibe spiegelte:

Identifizierung: Sonnen-Reflexion

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2012/2013 - Deutschland

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Eine weitere Email mit ungenügenden Daten zum Sichtungszeitpunkt erreichte uns und zeigt als gutes Beispiel, wir in solchen Fällen an unsere Grenzen der Nachrecherche stoßen. Wir brauchen im Ideal-Fall einfach kurzfristige Meldungen, die genaue Uhrzeit und Datum sowie Beobachtungsort mit Himmelsrichtung angeben. Alle Meldungen, welche diese Grunddaten fehlen, sind einfach nicht korrekt zu untersuchen, auch wenn in nachfolgender Email Beobachtungsdetails einen Hinweis auf möglichen Stimuli geben:

Die Beobachtungsdetail sprechen für einen Wetterballon welcherd urch entweichen des Gase´s  seine Flugstabillität verloren hat und in "Schlangenlinien" ein Spielball der vorherrschenden Höhenwinde wurde. Da er sich noch in einer Höhe befand in welcher er noch von der Sonne angestrahlt werden konnte, aber keine perfekte Ballon-Form mehr hatte, war die Reflexion des Sonnenlichts beeinträchtigt und daher nur schwach ausgeprägt. Diese VERMUTUNG ist jedoch durch eine Nachfrage bei etwaiger zuständigen Wetterstation nicht möglich, da hier einfach die Oben aufgeführten Grunddaten fehlen, daher bewerten wir diese Meldung als Near-Ifo: Wetter-Ballon

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9.08.2015 - Hannover 

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Per Email meldete sich Herr T.S. bei unserer UFO-Meldestelle und lieferte zusätzlich ein Video seiner Beobachtung die er mit einer Infrarot-Nachtsichtkamera von einem Leuchtkörper machte welcher dreifache Venusgröße hatte:

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Sehr geehrter Herr Köhler / CENAP
Mit diesem Schreiben möchte ich die Sichtung eines mir nicht bekannten Himmelsobjektes melden.
Anliegend im Anhang übersende ich Ihnen:
-Ein originales Filmdokument (.avi)
-eine von mir bearbeitete Lagekarte zur Situation durch Google- maps (.jpg)
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-sowie ein von mir erstelltes Textdokument mit Details zur verwendeten Kamera (.txt)
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Für eine umgehende Sichtung meines Materiales wäre ich Ihnen sehr dankbar,
da ich selbst einige Kriterien zur natürlichen Erklärung im Nachhinein durch logisches Nachdenken
ausschliessen konnte:
- Bekanntes Flugobjekt (Keinerlei Geräusche,keine Positions- Lichter o.ä.)
- Sternschnuppe (momentan ist / war ja die "Persiden-Zeit"..., aber fehlender Schweif und unstimmige Grösse)
- Himmels-Laterne (statisches Licht ohne Veränderung mit gleichmäßiger,zügiger Bewegungs-Richtung)
- Drohne (der erfasste Sichtungsraum / Flugstrecke sind m.E. einfach zu groß für ein optisch gesteuertes RC-Gerät)
Die Sichtung und Dokumentation des Falles
fand am 9.August 2015 im südlichen Raum Hannover statt.
Zwischenzeitliche Versuche,eine offizielle Meldung an Mufon-CES sowie die Ufo-Datenbank zu übermitteln,gestalteten sich als recht schwierig,
sowohl was die Meldung als auch die Übertragung der Daten betrifft.
Um eine Konvertierung (und somit eine Verfälschung) der hochzuladenden Daten auszuschließen,
verwarf ich eine Meldung an die oben genannte Stellen und wende mich nun an ihre Einrichtung.
Ich versichere Ihnen hiermit,das es sich bei diesem Fall NICHT um eine Fälschung,
einen Scherz oder dergleichen handelt!
Mit freundlichen Grüßen T.S.
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Um die Uhrzeit der Beobachtung zu bestimmen ergab die Nachfrage diese weitere Information:
Leider kann ich ihnen keine exaktere Uhrzeit nennen. Um ca. 23h verliess ich die Badeteiche und um ca. 0.h20-0h30 war ich zuhause 20km. Da ich früh berufstätig bin, habe ich die Datei erst am nächsten Tag auf den Rechner übertragen, daher der Timestamp der Datei vom folgenden Montag.
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Nach Sichtung der Video-Aufnahmen machten wir davon nachfolgende Frams, welche zu erst nur den Leuchtkörper und gegen Ende der Aufnahme das Verschwinden hinter Bäumen zeigt:
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Auf Grund der angegebenen Beobachtungsdetails und der besseren Beobachtungszeiteinschränkung der Video-Aufnahme gegen 23 Uhr konnten Überprüfungen der üblich Verdächtigen erfolgen. Und so konnte auch in diesem Fall der Überflug von ISS Internationale Raumstation in Betracht gezogen werden. Standortüberprüfung von Hannover betreff der ISS-Überflugdaten waren für 23 Uhr gegeben, nachfolgende Flugbahn über Hannover zum gegebenen Beobachtungszeitpunkt:
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Identifizierung: ISS Internationale Raumstation
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CENAP-Mannheim, hjkc



Tags: UFO-Forschung 

1728 Views

Freitag, 21. August 2015 - 09:00 Uhr

Raumfahrt - Back on Track: Russland will wiederverwendbares Raumfähren-Programm wiederbeleben

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After a 25-year pause since the death of Russia’s winged space shuttle program, known as Buran (Snowstorm) designed to serve as the Soviet counterpart to the US Space Shuttle, Russia is set to develop a new Reusable Space Rocket System, or MRKS in Russian.
The idea is to reduce the cost of launching satellites and other equipment into space. The system, which is being developed under the Federal Space Program, is set to cost not less than 12.5 billion rubles ($185 mln).
The program is set to get financing from 2021 and last until 2025. In 2019, a mission requirement package is slated to be worked on.
The program envisions a partially reusable launch vehicle equipped with a winged booster stage. After lifting the second, expendable stage of the MRKS vehicle into the stratosphere, the reusable booster would separate and glide back to Earth to be prepared for its next mission.
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Russia is set to develop a new Reusable Space Rocket System, or MRKS in Russian.
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The launches will be operated from the Vostochny space launch center in the Russian Far East.
The Rocket System is being developed by Khrunichev Space Center in close cooperation with other Russian aerospace heavyweightssuch as NPO Molniya, TsAGI, and others.
According to Khrunichev's official website, the MRKS-1 is a partially reusable modular vertical launch vehicle based on a winged reusable first stage, featuring airplane configuration and returning to the launch area for horizontal landing on a class 1 airfield.
The MRKS-1 also includes disposable second stages and upper stages. The winged first stage is equipped with reusable liquid-propellant sustainers.
According to TsAGI, the MRKS-1's reusable first stage will allow for a high degree of reliability and safety and will make booster impact areas unnecessary. This will increase the effectiveness of future commercial operations. Under the Federal Space Agency’s specified requirements, the MRKS-1 is to deliver a wide range of payloads into outer space, weighing up to 35 metric tons and more.
A cycle of tests of several models of winged reusable rocket stages was completed in April 2013 with the use of TsAGI's UT-1M and T-117 wind tunnels. These winged stages are to become the reusable first stage of the MRKS-1.
The idea of using winged vehicles for space flight has been in the minds of space enthusiasts since the dawn of the space era.
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Antonov An-225 aircraft flies with Buran space shuttle on external store
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In Russia, Tsiolkovsky and Tsander considered airplanes among other means of reaching outer space.
Practical attempts to install rocket engines on winged vehicles were performed in the USSR and in Germany back in the 1930s.
Sergei Korolev and his colleagues at the Reactive Research Institute, RNII, worked on the RP-318 rocket glider equipped with a rocket engine.
In the USSR, Vladimir Chelomei, the head of the OKB-52 design bureau of the Ministry Aviation Industry, MAP, specialized in the development of winged cruise missiles. He was one of the first in the country to push the idea of a manned winged orbiter.
Also, from the mid-1960s, the Mikoyan design bureau was developing a small reusable spacecraft called Spiral. This mini-shuttle would have been launched on the back of a hypersonic aircraft, itself capable of reaching Mach 6 (or six times of the speed of sound). After separation from the carrier aircraft, the Spiral would be powered by an attached rocket stage.
At the beginning of the 1970s, the US made the Space Shuttle a primary project of its manned space program. According to NASA predictions, the Space Shuttle would replace the entire fleet of existing rockets and lower the cost of launching satellites.
In 1976, the Soviet government decided to respond with a similar spacecraft, Energia-Buran.
However after a single flight in 1988, the program quickly ran out of funds, as the Soviet Ministry of Defense fully realized the lack of purpose for the system, compared to its tremendous cost.
With the collapse of the Soviet Union, the program was essentially shut down and, in 1993, the head of NPO Energia, Yuri Semenov publicly admitted that the project was dead.
Quelle: Sputnik

Tags: Raumfahrt 

1735 Views

Freitag, 21. August 2015 - 08:46 Uhr

Astronomie - Asteroiden-Einschlag in der Nähe von Puerto Rico im September 2015 ? Nicht wahr, sagt NASA!

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Asteroid to Strike Near Puerto Rico? Not True, Says NASA

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The rumors flying around Twitter, YouTube and other corners of the Internet about a giant asteroid striking Earth? Total nonsense, according to NASA.
The erroneous story varies, but mostly it goes like this: an asteroid will hit near Puerto Rico between September 15 and 28, 2015, and destroy much of the Southeastern United States, the Gulf Coast of Mexico, and parts of Central and South America.
"There is no scientific basis -- not one shred of evidence -- that an asteroid or any other celestial object will impact Earth on those dates," Paul Chodas, manager of NASA's Near-Earth Object office, said in a statement.
Yes, NASA is always keeping an eye out for "potentially hazardous asteroids," and it turns out there is a 0.01 percent chance that one will hit Earth in the next 100 years.
How do they know? NASA spends around $40 million a year tracking asteroids and other near-Earth objects, both for research purposes and to make sure that killer space objects doesn't catch us by surprise.There are also many telescopes scanning the sky from various organizations, and none of them has spotted an asteroid headed toward Puerto Rico."If there were any object large enough to do that type of destruction in September," Chodas said, "we would have seen something of it by now."
Quelle: NBC

Tags: Astronomie sagt NASA! 

1440 Views


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