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Sonntag, 11. Oktober 2015 - 17:45 Uhr

UFO-Forschung - UFO-Absturz bei Roswell 1947 ? Teil-38

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The Roswell Corner
The Roswell Slides slow and painful death
After the release of SUNlite 7-4, the Roswell Slides debacle practically disappeared from the Internet. Maussan and his experts appeared to be still sticking to their guns regarding the supposed size of the body and that the body is not the mummy that was on display at Montezuma Castle/Mesa Verde. Most of their arguments are severely flawed as I pointed out in last issue. They have yet to hold their planned press conference, which was canceled last June. Maybe Maussan will hope that his failure will fade from memory and he can move on to the next UFO promotional event.
From what I have been able to understand, Schmitt and Carey did not mention the slides at the Roswell festival. In August, Carey finally appeared to tell everyone on the Jim Harold podcast that the case was not closed on the slides. His arguments were all the same nonsense spouted out prior to SUNlite 7-4. They are as weak as they are worthless. Carey then went out of his way to show disdain for certain members of the Roswell Slides Research Group. We rained on his parade and now he is attempting to demonize the group.
Meanwhile, the Carey and Schmitt apologists have figured a way to keep them credible. They are being excused for their woefully inadequate research by stating they were limited by Adam Dew’s control of the slides. It is hard to believe such exaggerations because all of the promoters claimed to have access to the high quality scans of the slides prior to the event. Deblurring Bragalia’s scans demonstrated the evidence was there for all to discover. They simply did not want to look.
This excuse of being fooled by Dew, if accurate, brings up a serious problem with Carey and Schmitt’s research that they publish. If they were so easily fooled by a photograph of a mummy, what does it say for all those interviews they claim prove Roswell was the crash of an alien spaceship? Is it possible that some, most, or all of their witnesses have been fooling them as well? How much of what they write is just as inaccurate as the research they conducted on the slides themselves? Quite a few of the statements made by these two “respected researchers” before and after May 5th were so inaccurate and misleading that one has to really question just about anything they say or write about the subject. I have been under the opinion for many years that the writings in Schmitt and Carey’s books are wild exaggerations and distortions. The Roswell slides fiasco confirmed that opinion.
Ten “undeniable truths” about the Roswell slides
Based on how Tom Carey and Don Schmitt write their conclusions about Roswell, an “Undeniable truth” does not have to be a fact. It is just their opinion. With that in mind, I created some of my own “undeniable truths” regarding the Roswell slides. However, contrary to what Carey and Schmitt state about the Roswell case, many of these “truths” ARE facts. Others are opinions based on a preponderance of the evidence.
1. Tom Carey, after examining the slides, declared that the photographs were not taken in a museum setting even though there are numerous artifacts visible in the photograph that demonstrate it was a museum of some kind.
2. Don Schmitt conceded that the slides showed a mummy but reversed his opinion a few weeks later.
3. Tom Carey stated that skeptics could not admit when they are wrong but can not admit he might have made a mistake with
the Roswell slides.
4. The placard, when deblurred, states that the body is that of a mummified two year old boy. This is a proven fact that many
people have been able to replicate.
5. There was a mummified body of a two year old boy that was on display at Mesa Verde in early 1947. Photographs of this body
in the records, despite objections by Carey, Schmitt, and Maussan, are a good match to the body seen in the Roswell slides.
6. The Rays visited Colorado during the mid to late 1940s as evidenced by their photographs from the region.
7. There is no evidence, that can be verified, which proves Bernard and Hilda Ray ever personally knew the Eisenhowers.
8. Jaimie Maussan has reneged on his reward for photographs that match the Roswell slides. He can make everyone think the
body is not the same but the evidence indicates otherwise.
9. None of the scientists, employed by Maussan, have published any of their findings in independent scientific journals where
their work is subject to criticism from qualified experts.
10. There is no evidence presented to date that the Roswell Slides are a photograph of an alien discovered at Roswell or that it is
something that is not human.
Quelle: SUNlite 7/2015

Tags: UFO-Forschung 

1405 Views

Sonntag, 11. Oktober 2015 - 17:15 Uhr

Raumfahrt-History - 1956: Küste zu Küste in 40 Minuten

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Aus dem CENAP-Archiv:

Quelle: CENAP-Archiv


Tags: Raumfahrt 

1424 Views

Sonntag, 11. Oktober 2015 - 11:54 Uhr

Astronomie - Exoplaneten Jubiläum: Von Null auf Tausende in 20 Jahren

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This year we celebrate the discovery of 51 Pegasi b in October, 1995. This giant planet is about half the size of Jupiter and orbits its star in about four days. '51 Peg' helped launch a whole new field of exploration. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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October 6 marks the 20th anniversary of the first discovery of a planet orbiting a sun-like, or "normal," star beyond our solar system. The planet, called 51 Pegasi b, belongs to a class of planets now known as exoplanets. Since that momentous discovery, thousands more exoplanets have been found in our galaxy.
As of today, there are more than 1,800 confirmed exoplanets. More than 1,000 of these were discovered by NASA's Kepler mission, breaking wide open the field of exoplanet science. Kepler has even identified some planets with Earth-like traits, such as Kepler-452b, a near-Earth-size planet found in the habitable zone of a sun-like star. The habitable zone is the region around a star where temperatures are just right for one of life's essential ingredients -- water -- to pool on a planet's surface.
NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, manages the Kepler and K2 missions for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, managed Kepler mission development. Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation operates the flight system with support from the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado Boulder.
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It took humans thousands of years to find the seven other planets in our solar system, and, not long ago, it seemed possible that was the limit of what we'd discover.  Exoplanets, especially Earth-like ones, were the stuff of science fiction.
Then, everything changed.  What began with the single discovery of an incredibly hot, strange planet orbiting another star 20 years ago has now brought us to the cusp of answering ancient questions about our place in the galaxy and whether or not other worlds like ours exist. Today—and  thousands of discoveries later—astronomers  are on the cusp of finding something people have dreamed about for thousands of years: another Earth.
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This diagram shows how astronomers observed a distant gas giant planet around OGLE-2005-BLG-169 using microlensing.
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A unique feature of the seventh Kepler candidate catalog is that it is the first to fully automate the assessment of transit-like signals. The total height of each bar shows the total number of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), or transit-like signals, in each catalog. The blue area shows the number that was assessed, which includes all newly found KOIs. The grey area shows the number that were not able to be assessed due to time constraints imposed by manual assessment, which includes KOIs assessed in previous catalogs. As a result of the new automated procedures employed in this seventh catalog, all KOIs could be assessed. The resulting impact is that we are able to deliver a more uniform planet candidate catalog that utilizes the entire Kepler dataset, which will enable more accurate estimates of the number of small habitable zone planets in our galaxy.
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This disintegrating planet is an endangered species. Boiling away due to its close proximity to its star, it is quickly disappearing at least in cosmic terms. While planets like Earth last billions of years, this one could be gone in just 200 million. And although the star it orbits is smaller and cooler than our sun, the planets orbit is so tight that its yearone complete orbitis only 16 hours long. The planets surface temperature? Around 3,300 degrees Fahrenheit.
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A newly discovered exoplanet, Kepler-452b, comes the closest of any found so far to matching our Earth-sun system. This artist’s conception of a planetary lineup shows habitable zone planets with similarities to Earth: from left, Kepler-22b, Kepler-69c, the just announced Kepler-452b, Kepler-62f and Kepler-186f. Last in line is Earth itself.
Quelle: NASA

Tags: Astronomie 

1481 Views

Sonntag, 11. Oktober 2015 - 11:15 Uhr

Astronomie - Planeten-Tanz am Morgenhimmel

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Eigentlich hatte ich Gesternabend schon die Spechtelstunde abgesagt, nach dem Nebel aufzog und schon am Samstagmorgen die Beobachtung über dem Odenwald platzen lies. Um so mehr war ich hellwach, als um 6.25 MESZ das UFO-Meldestelle-Telefon von CENAP klingelte und eine Frau M. aus Ladenburg bei Heidelberg ganz aufgeregt mitteilte, das sie und ihr Mann seit einer halben Stunde ein helles grelles Licht am östlichen Himmel beobachten würden und ich sagen könne um WAS es sich handelt.

Klar war in dieser Sekunde, das Morgenstern Venus zuschlägt und somit ein klarer Morgenhimmel gegeben sein muss. Also der aufgeregten Anruferin den Morgenstern Venus und das mit der Atmosphäre erklärt, ihr noch ein schönen Tag gewünscht, aufgelegt und schnell an das Fenster. Und ja, auch über dem Odenwald war klare Sicht auf den Planeten-Tanz und so gab es kein Halten mehr. Nachfolgend ein paar Fotos von der Spechtelstunde am Morgen:

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Fotos: ©-hjkc


Tags: Astronomie 

1721 Views

Samstag, 10. Oktober 2015 - 23:50 Uhr

Raumfahrt - NASA gibt von MESSENGER 43. bis 49. Monat in seiner Umlaufbahn um Merkur gesammelten Daten für die Öffentlichkeit frei

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Date acquired: April 30, 2015
Image Mission Elapsed Time (MET): 72716050
Image ID: 8422953
Instrument: Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) of the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS)
Center Latitude: 72.0°
Center Longitude: 223.8° E
Resolution: 2.1 meters/pixel
Scale: This image is about 1 kilometers (0.6 miles) across
Of Interest: Today, the MESSENGER spacecraft sent its final image. 
Originally planned to orbit Mercury for one year, the mission exceeded all expectations, lasting for over four years and acquiring extensive datasets with its seven scientific instruments and radio science investigation. This afternoon, the spacecraft succumbed to the pull of solar gravity and impacted Mercury's surface. The image shown here is the last one acquired and transmitted back to Earth by the mission. The image is located within the floor of the 93-kilometer-diameter crater Jokai. The spacecraft struck the planet just north of Shakespeare basin. 
As the first spacecraft ever to orbit Mercury, MESSENGER revolutionized our understanding of the Solar System's innermost planet, as well as accomplished technological firsts that made the mission possible. Check out these movies of the Top 10 Science Results and the Top 10 Technology Innovations from the mission.

 

Planetary Data System Releases 14th Delivery of MESSENGER Data
Data collected during MESSENGER's 43rd through 49th months in orbit around Mercury were released to the public today by NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS), the network of nodes that archives and distributes data from NASA's planetary missions. With this release, all data acquired by the MESSENGER mission are now available online - data collected through eight full Mercury solar days of orbit about the innermost planet in our solar system.
NASA requires that all of its planetary missions archive their data in the PDS to provide documented, peer-reviewed datasets to the research community. This 14th delivery of MESSENGER data extends the formatted raw and calibrated data available at the PDS for the spacecraft's science instruments and the radio science investigation to the period from September 18, 2014, to April 30, 2015, when the MESSENGER mission ended with the spacecraft's anticipated impact onto Mercury's surface.
Ancillary spacecraft, planet, instrument, camera-matrix, and events (SPICE) data from launch through the end of spacecraft operations are included in this release. 
The ACT-REACT QuickMap interactive Web interface to MESSENGER data has been updated to incorporate the full coverage of the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) orbital data and the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) Visible and Infrared Spectrograph (VIRS) measurements included in this delivery. QuickMap can be accessed via links on the MESSENGER websites at http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/ and http://www.nasa.gov/messenger. MDIS mosaics can be downloaded from http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/the_mission/mosaics.html.
The data for this release are available online at https://pds.nasa.gov/tools/subscription_service/SS-20151009.shtml, and all of the MESSENGER data archived at the PDS are available at http://pds.nasa.gov. 
This is the final scheduled release of MESSENGER raw data products. The final release of MESSENGER calibrated and advanced products is scheduled for May 6, 2016.
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Bottom Image Scale: This image is roughly 130 km (81 miles) across.
Of Interest: The day before the MESSENGER spacecraft impacted the surface of Mercury, the best prediction for the location and time of the impact was 54.4° N, 210.1° E, on 30 April 2015 at 19.26:02 UTC, as shown in the featured image of that day. 
In the last month since impact, MESSENGER engineers have completed the final and most accurate determination of where the MESSENGER spacecraft impacted Mercury’s surface. The determination indicates that the spacecraft impacted into a part of Mercury's surface that has a gradual incline with an approximate slope of 8.5°. The final estimate of the impact location is at 54.4398° N, 210.1205° E, and 2438.790 km from the center of Mercury. The final determination of the impact time is 19:26:01.166 UTC on 30 April 2015. 
Traveling at 3.912 kilometers per second (8,750 miles per hour), the MESSENGER spacecraft is estimated to have created a crater 16 meters (52 feet) in diameter at this location. This new best determination of the impact location will help the next Mercury spacecraft to identify MESSENGER's crater, such as the joint ESA-JAXA BepiColombo mission, scheduled for lauch in 2017 and arrival in Mercury orbit in 2024.
The MESSENGER spacecraft was the first ever to orbit the planet Mercury. In the mission's more than four years of orbital operations, MESSENGER acquired over 270,000 images and extensive other data sets. View highlights of the mission in this image highlights collection and details about its final month of orbital operations at this page. MESSENGER's highly successful orbital mission came to an end, as the spacecraft ran out of propellant and the force of solar gravity caused it to impact the surface of Mercury on April 30, 2015.
Quelle: NASA

Tags: Raumfahrt 

1481 Views

Samstag, 10. Oktober 2015 - 21:00 Uhr

Raumfahrt-History - 1977: Space-Shuttle-Ära / Raumschiff Enterprise Teil-2

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Aus dem CENAP-Archiv:

Quelle: CENAP-Archiv


Tags: Raumfahrt 

1466 Views

Samstag, 10. Oktober 2015 - 18:15 Uhr

Raumfahrt-History - 1977: Space-Shuttle-Ära / Raumschiff Enterprise Teil-1

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Aus dem CENAP-Archiv:

Quelle: CENAP-Archiv


Tags: Raumfahrt 

1519 Views

Samstag, 10. Oktober 2015 - 18:00 Uhr

Astronomie - UH-Hilo wird neues Unterrichts Teleskop als Ersatz für Hoku Kea kaufen

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While it’s not clear where it will be placed, University of Hawaii at Hilo still plans to buy a new teaching telescope after being told to remove its tiny observatory from Mauna Kea.
Decommissioning the broken Hoku Kea telescope was announced in July after Gov. David Ige, in response to protests that have blocked construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope, asked for the removal of at least three of the 13 telescopes on the mountain by the time TMT is built.
After several years of failed attempts by UH-Hilo to repair its 0.9-meter telescope, which was delivered inoperable, the news was almost devastating for astronomy faculty who were just about to buy a replacement and still hoped to salvage the project.
But, after talks between faculty and university leaders, the $450,000 state lawmakers already allocated to purchase a replacement will remain dedicated, assuming it’s built anywhere other than Mauna Kea, faculty members said.
That was good news for Pierre Martin, an assistant astronomy professor and Hoku Kea director.
“For us, it’s a very important thing,” said Martin about having a telescope dedicated to students.
“Our mission, our vision has not changed at all. This is what we want to do. But we need the tools to do that.”
He said the new 0.7-meter telescope, which is being built by a separate company, likely will be delivered next summer.
The university also plans to make it available to local high school students.
Martin said the telescope and its 18-foot-wide dome temporarily will be installed at UH-Hilo if a permanent site isn’t immediately available.
With Hilo’s cloudy and wet weather, that’s not an ideal location for a telescope, but students still could learn technical skills, such as how to install instruments and other equipment, he said.
Martin said a permanent location would need clear skies and be easy to access. He doesn’t have a list of potential sites; he just knows where he can’t put it.
“It’s sad because this (Mauna Kea) is the best place but we cannot do it,” Martin said.
Mauna Kea is prized by astronomers for its clear skies and Native Hawaiians who consider it one of their most sacred sites. Hawaiian activists, who see construction at the summit as desecration, have blocked grubbing and grading work at the TMT site several times this year, and construction remains delayed.
Removal of the existing Hoku Kea telescope and dome is expected to begin by 2016, officials said.
The Caltech Submillimeter Observatory site will be returned to its natural state by 2018. No other decommissioning plans have been announced.
Martin said the telescope’s new dome will be lighter and more portable.
Quelle: Hawaii Tribune-Herald

Tags: Astronomie 

1578 Views

Samstag, 10. Oktober 2015 - 17:36 Uhr

Raumfahrt - China studiert an Next-Generation-Taikonauten-Raumschiff für zukünftige Missionen

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China is eyeing a next-generation human space transportation system to carry taikonauts to future space stations and to conduct missions to the moon, Mars and asteroids, according to a report on a Chinese space blog.
A feasibility study proposes a conical spacecraft similar to the American Orion and Apollo capsules capable of carrying between two and six crew members. The capsule would be attached to service modules of different sizes similar to the ones used for Apollo missions.
The baseline spacecraft would weigh 14 tons, with a 20 metric ton version featuring a longer service module. The vehicles would be used to support near-Earth, asteroid, lunar and Mars missions. The study eyes reusing the return capsules.
The new spacecraft would be launched aboard Long March 5 and Long March 7 rockets due to their increased weights.
China is currently flying Shenzhou spacecraft that are similar in appearance and size to the Russian Soyuz transport. The Shenzhou is capable of carrying three crew members.
The report indicates that a feasibility study has been conducted. However, it does not appear as if a program has been approved and funded.
Quelle: PARABOLIC ARC

Tags: Raumfahrt 

1609 Views

Samstag, 10. Oktober 2015 - 11:44 Uhr

Mars-Chroniken - Mars im Focus von MRO

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Fresh Crater Near Sirenum Fossae Region of Mars

The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter acquired this closeup image of a "fresh" (on a geological scale, though quite old on a human scale) impact crater in the Sirenum Fossae region of Mars on March 30, 2015.
This impact crater appears relatively recent as it has a sharp rim and well-preserved ejecta. The steep inner slopes are carved by gullies and include possible recurring slope lineae on the equator-facing slopes. Fresh craters often have steep, active slopes, so the HiRISE team is monitoring this crater for changes over time. The bedrock lithology is also diverse. The crater is a little more than 1-kilometer wide.
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Light Toned Deposit in the Aureum Chaos Region on Mars
The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter acquired this closeup image of a light-toned deposit in Aureum Chaos, a 368 kilometer (229 mile) wide area in the eastern part of Valles Marineris, on Jan. 15, 2015, at 2:51 p.m. local Mars time.
The objective of this observation is to examine a light-toned deposit in a region of what is called “chaotic terrain.” There are indications of layers in the image. Some shapes suggest erosion by a fluid moving north and south. The top of the light-toned deposit appears rough, in contrast to the smoothness of its surroundings.
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For Anniversary of Orbiter's Launch: Seasonal Flows in Mars' Valles Marineris
Among the many discoveries by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter since the mission was launched on Aug. 12, 2005, are seasonal flows on some steep slopes. These flows have a set of characteristics consistent with shallow seeps of salty water.
This July 21, 2015, image from the orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera shows examples of these flows on a slope within Coprates Chasma, which is part of the grandest canyon system on Mars, Valles Marineris.  The image covers an area of ground one-third of a mile (536 meters) wide.
These flows are called recurring slope lineae because they fade and disappear during cold seasons and reappear in warm seasons, repeating this pattern every Martian year.  The flows seen in this image are on a north-facing slope, so they are active in northern-hemisphere spring.  The flows emanate from the relatively bright bedrock and flow onto sandy fans, where they are remarkably straight, following linear channels. Valles Marineris contains more of these flows than everywhere else on Mars combined. At any season, some are active, though on different slope aspects at different seasons.  
Future human explorers (and settlers?) will need water to drink, grow food, produce oxygen to breath, and make rocket fuel.  Bringing all of that water from Earth would be extremely expensive, so using water on Mars is essential. Although there is plenty of water ice at high latitudes, surviving the cold winters would be difficult.  An equatorial source of water would be preferable, so Valles Marineris may be the best destination.  However, the chemistry of this water must be understood before betting any lives on it.
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This image includes an especially long example of a type of dark marking that advances down some Martian slopes in warmer months and fades away in cooler months.
The features, called "recurrent slope linea," may be seasonal flows of salty water. Red arrows indicate the location of one on this image taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. This one is three-quarters of a mile (1.2 kilometers) long.
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NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has revealed to scientists slender dark markings -- possibly due to salty water - that advance seasonally down slopes surprisingly close to the Martian equator.
"The equatorial surface region of Mars has been regarded as dry, free of liquid or frozen water, but we may need to rethink that," said Alfred McEwen of the University of Arizona in Tucson, principal investigator for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera.
Tracking how these features recur each year is one example of how the longevity of NASA orbiters observing Mars is providing insight about changes on many time scales. Researchers at the American Geophysical Union meeting Tuesday in San Francisco discussed a range of current Martian activity, from fresh craters offering glimpses of subsurface ice to multi-year patterns in the occurrence of large, regional dust storms.
The seasonally changing surface flows were first reported two years ago on mid-latitude southern slopes. They are finger-like features typically less than 16 feet (5 meters) wide that appear and extend down steep, rocky slopes during spring through summer, then fade in winter and return the next spring. Recently observed slopes stretch as long as 4,000 feet (1,200 meters).
McEwen and co-authors reported the equatorial flows at the conference and in a paper published online Tuesday by Nature Geoscience. Five well-monitored sites with these markings are in Valles Marineris, the largest canyon system in the solar system. At each of these sites, the features appear on both north- and south-facing walls. On the north-facing slopes, they are active during the part of the year when those slopes get the most sunshine. The counterparts on south-facing slopes start flowing when the season shifts and more sunshine hits their side. 
"The explanation that fits best is salty water is flowing down the slopes when the temperature rises," McEwen said. "We still don't have any definite identification of water at these sites, but there's nothing that rules it out, either." 
Dissolved salts can keep water melted at temperatures when purer water freezes, and they can slow the evaporation rate so brine can flow farther. This analysis used data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars and the Context Camera on the MRO as well as the Thermal Emission Imaging System experiment on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter. 
Water ice has been identified in another dynamic process researchers are monitoring with MRO. Impacts of small asteroids or bits of comets dig many fresh craters on Mars every year. Twenty fresh craters have exposed bright ice previously hidden beneath the surface. Five were reported in 2009. The 15 newly reported ones are distributed over a wider range of latitudes and longitudes. 
"The more we find, the more we can fill in a global map of where ice is buried," said Colin Dundas of the U.S. Geological Survey in Flagstaff, Ariz. "We've now seen icy craters down to 39 degrees north, more than halfway from the pole to the equator. They tell us that either the average climate over several thousand years is wetter than present or that water vapor in the current atmosphere is concentrated near the surface. Ice could have formed under wetter conditions, with remnants from that time persisting today, but slowly disappearing." 
Mars' modern climate becomes better known each year because of a growing set of data from a series of orbiters that have been studying Mars continually since 1997. That has been almost nine Martian years because a year on Mars is almost two years long on Earth. Earlier missions and surface landers have added insight about the dynamics of Mars' atmosphere and its interaction with the ground. 
"The dust cycle is the main driver of the climate system," said Robert Haberle of NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif. 
One key question researchers want to answer is why dust storms encircle Mars in some years and not in others. These storms affect annual patterns of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, freezing into polar ice caps in winter and replenishing the atmosphere in spring. Identifying significant variations in annual patterns requires many Martian years of observations. 
The data emerging from long-term studies will help future human explorers of Mars know where to find resources such as water, how to prepare for hazards such as dust storms, and where to be extra careful about contamination with Earth microbes. 
Launched in 2005, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and its six instruments have provided more high-resolution data about the Red Planet than all other Mars orbiters combined. Data are made available for scientists worldwide to research, analyze and report their findings. 
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., manages the MRO and Mars Odyssey missions for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Denver built both orbiters. The University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory operates the HiRISE camera, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. of Boulder, Colo. 
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Recurring "Lineae" on Slopes at Horowitz Crater
The dark, narrow streaks flowing downhill on Mars at sites such as this portion of Horowitz Crater are inferred to be formed by seasonal flow of water on modern-day Mars. The streaks are roughly the length of a football field.
The imaging and topographical information in this processed view come from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
These dark features on the slopes are called "recurring slope lineae" or RSL. Planetary scientists using observations with the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer on the same orbiter detected hydrated salts on these slopes at Horowitz Crater, corroborating the hypothesis that the streaks are formed by briny liquid water.
The image was produced by first creating a 3-D computer model (a digital terrain map) of the area based on stereo information from two HiRISE observations, and then draping an image over the land-shape model. The vertical dimension is exaggerated by a factor of 1.5 compared to horizontal dimensions. The draped image is a red waveband (monochrome) product from HiRISE observation PSP_005787_1475, taken on Oct. 21, 2007, at 32 degrees south latitude, 141 degrees east longitude.
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Dark, Recurring Streaks on Walls of Garni Crater on Mars
Dark narrow streaks, called "recurring slope lineae," emanate from the walls of Garni Crater on Mars, in this view constructed from observations by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
The dark streaks here are up to few hundred yards, or meters, long. They are hypothesized to be formed by flow of briny liquid water on Mars.
The image was produced by first creating a 3-D computer model (a digital terrain map) of the area based on stereo information from two HiRISE observations, and then draping an image over the land-shape model. The vertical dimension is exaggerated by a factor of 1.5 compared to horizontal dimensions. The draped image is a red waveband (monochrome) product from HiRISE observation ESP_031059_1685, taken on March 12, 2013 at 11.5 degrees south latitude, 290.3 degrees east longitude
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The Ares 3 Landing Site: Where Science Fact Meets Fiction
This image from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a location on Mars associated with the best-selling novel and Hollywood movie, "The Martian."
This area is in the Acidalia Planitia region. In the novel and the movie, it is the landing site of a crewed mission named Ares 3. For the story's central character, Acidalia Planitia is within driving distance from where NASA's Mars Pathfinder, with its Sojourner rover, landed in 1997. 
An initial HiRISE image of the site was taken in April 2015 and is online at http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/ESP_040776_2115. A second one was taken May 17, 2015, and is shown here. Figure A is a stereo combination of the two, appearing three-dimensional when viewed through blue-red glasses with the red lens on the left
One of the main objectives of the HiRISE camera is to carry out "monitoring science", which involves taking images of certain areas of high scientific interest on regular intervals. The team usually does so to monitor a seasonal or recurring process such as seasonal changes in carbon-dioxide ice near the poles, dune movement or recurring flow-like features on some slopes. HiRISE also takes repeated images of areas with active rovers, such as Curiosity, to help plan safe routes toward areas of high scientific interest.
Another key responsibility for the HiRISE camera is to provide information for use in selection of landing sites for future missions. One technique is to image a site of interest at least twice when the weather conditions are similar, but with a small difference in viewing angle, much like what you would experience if you looked at something with only your right eye, then looked at it again with the left. By doing this, we are able to build a stereo view of the site, providing a chance to identify high and low points in the site more effectively. This resulting 3-D information can combined with elevation data from laser altimeters to create a highly accurate "digital terrain model" or DTM for short.
DTMs allow researchers to view the locations in 3-D and to analyze them by measuring the exact height of features that could be hazardous to the future mission, such as large boulders or small impact craters. DTMs from HiRISE were a key factor in choosing the landing site for NASA's Curiosity Mars rover in Gale Crater and are being used to evaluate sites under consideration for the NASA's 2016 InSight Mars lander and Mars 2020 rover missions.
The location of the site in this image is 31.3 degrees north latitude, 331.3 degrees east latitude. The image is an excerpt from HiRISE observation ESP_041277_2115.
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'The Martian' Story's Ares 4 Landing Site
This image from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a location on Mars associated with the best-selling novel and Hollywood movie, "The Martian." It is the science-fiction tale's planned landing site for the Ares 4 mission.
The novel placed the Ares 4 site on the floor of a very shallow crater in the southwestern corner of Schiaparelli Crater. This HiRISE image shows a flat region there entirely mantled by bright Martian dust. There are no color variations, just uniform reddish dust. A pervasive, pitted texture visible at full resolution is characteristic of many dust deposits on Mars. No boulders are visible, so the dust is probably at least a meter thick.
Past Martian rover and lander missions from NASA have avoided such pervasively dust-covered regions for two reasons. First, the dust has a low thermal inertia, meaning that it gets extra warm in the daytime and extra cold at night, a thermal challenge to survival of the landers and rovers (and people). Second, the dust hides the bedrock, so little is known about the bedrock composition and whether it is of scientific interest.
This view is one image product from HiRISE observation ESP_042014_1760, taken July 14, 2015, at 3.9 degrees south latitude, 15.2 degrees east longitude.
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Western Edge of Mars' Marth Crater, a Movie Location
In the best-selling novel "The Martian" and the movie based on it, stranded astronaut Mark Watney's adventures take him to the rim of Mawrth Crater. This image from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows the nature of this terrain.
The crater rim is not very distinct, and from the Martian surface it would be quite difficult to tell that you are even on the rim of a crater. The terrain is hummocky and rolling, punctuated by smaller impact craters and wind-blown drifts of sand or dust.
This view is one image product from HiRISE observation ESP_042252_1930, taken Aug. 1, 2015, at 12.6 degrees north latitude, 355.7 degrees east longitude.
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Quelle: NASA

Tags: Mars-Chroniken 

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