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Astronomie - Unsere Sonne durch 7-Zoll-Linsenfernrohr und einem H-alpha-Filter

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DAYLIGHT REQUIRED: In the night sky, there are thousands of stars visible to the unaided eye, and thousands of times more stars in range of backyard optics. Not a single one of those faraway balls of fire, however, looks any bigger than a pinprick. For a better view of a star, you need some daylight:
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Impressive solar flare at the western limb, near AR 2014! The difference between the nearly simultaneous pictures at 8h22 (U.T.) shows the strong motions, with fast moving material blue-shifted by Doppler effect.
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This star is the sun. Francois Rouviere of Mougins, France, took the picture on March 31st using no more than a 7-inch refracting telescope and an "H-alpha" filter tuned to the red glow of solar hydrogen.
"I caught this impressive explosion at the sun's western limb near sunspot AR2014," says Rouviere. "The inset, which is at a wavelength 1 Å shorter than H-alpha, shows fast moving material blue-shifted by the Doppler effect."
Got a solar telescope? NOAA forecasters estimate a 40% chance of M-class flares and a 5% chance of X-flares on April 2nd. Train those optics on the daylight sky.
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Fotos:Francois Rouviere of Mougins, France
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Quelle: Spaceweather 
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