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Raumfahrt - ISS-ALLtag: Launch of Russia’s Nauka research module to orbital outpost rescheduled for July 21

9.07.2021

According to Roscosmos, the docking to the nadir port of the Zvezda service module is scheduled for about 4:26 p.m. Moscow time on July 29

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The launch of Russia’s Nauka multifunctional laboratory module to the International Space Station (ISS) is scheduled for July 21, Head of the State Space Corporation Roscosmos Dmitry Rogozin said on Thursday.

The launch of the Nauka research module to the orbital outpost was previously scheduled for July 15.

"The delivery of a Proton-M carrier rocket with the Nauka multifunctional laboratory module for the ISS Russian segment to the Baikonur launch pad is scheduled for July 17, and the launch for July 21 while July 22 and July 23 are the backup dates," Rogozin wrote in his Telegram channel.

As Roscosmos specified, the launch is scheduled for 5:54 p.m. Moscow time from site No. 200 of the Baikonur spaceport. The Nauka research module will travel eight days to reach the orbital outpost.

"The docking to the nadir port of the Zvezda service module is scheduled for about 4:26 p.m. Moscow time on July 29," the space agency said.

The Nauka module will dock to the place of the Pirs module that will be sunk on July 23, it said.

"The Progress MS-17 resupply ship is scheduled to undock together with the Pirs docking compartment module, which will be replaced by the Nauka module on the ISS, on July 23 (provided that the Nauka lab is launched on July 21)," Roscosmos said.

As the Russian space agency specified, the resupply ship and the Pirs module will re-enter the dense layers of the atmosphere, and their non-combustible fragments will splash down in the non-navigable part of the Pacific Ocean four hours after the undocking.

About the Nauka module

The Nauka multi-functional laboratory module is designated for implementing the Russian program of applied research and experiments. With the launch of the Nauka research module into operation, the Russian segment of the International Space Station will get additional space for equipping workplaces, storing cargoes, and accommodating water and oxygen regeneration equipment.

The Nauka module will provide a second toilet for Russian cosmonauts (the first is located in the Zvezda module), and a room for a third crewmember. It will also use the European Robotic Arm (ERA) that will help perform some operations without spacewalks.

Quelle: TASS

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Update: 12.07.2021

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Nauka module to ISS filled up with fuel, no remarks - Roscosmos chief

Dmitry Rogozin added that the module was scheduled to be transported to a technical site on Sunday, in order to continue preparations for the launch

Russia’s Nauka multifunctional laboratory module, which is scheduled to launch to the International Space Station (ISS) in July, has been filled up with fuel, Dmitry Rogozin, Director General of the Russian space agency Roscosmos, said on Saturday.

"The Nauka MLM [multifunctional laboratory module - TASS] has been filled with rocket fuel components. There are no remarks," Rogozin wrote on his Telegram channel.

The Roscosmos chief added that the module was scheduled to be transported to a technical site on Sunday, in order to continue preparations for the launch.

The Nauka multi-functional laboratory module is designated for implementing the Russian program of applied research and experiments. With the launch of the Nauka research module into operation, the Russian segment of the International Space Station will get additional space for equipping workplaces, storing cargoes and accommodating water and oxygen regeneration equipment.

The Nauka module will provide a second toilet for Russian cosmonauts (the first is located in the Zvezda module) and a room for a third crewmember. It will also use the European Robotic Arm (ERA) that will help perform some operations without spacewalks.

Nauka’s launch is scheduled for July 21 and its docking to the ISS for July 29.

Quelle: TASS

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Update: 15.07.2021

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NASA TV to Air Launch of Space Station Module, Departure of Another

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The Nauka Multipurpose Laboratory Module undergoes final processing at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan in preparation for its launch to the International Space Station on a Proton rocket.
Credits: Roscosmos

NASA will provide live coverage of a new Russian science module’s launch and automated docking to the International Space Station, and the undocking of another module that has been part of the orbital outpost for the past 20 years. Live coverage of all events will be available on NASA Television, the NASA app, and the agency’s website.

 

The uncrewed Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM), named Nauka, the Russian word for “science,” is scheduled to launch at 10:58 a.m. EDT (7:58 p.m. Baikonur time) Wednesday, July 21 on a three-stage Proton rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Live launch coverage will begin at 10:30 a.m.

 

Two days later, on Friday, July 23, the uncrewed ISS Progress 77 spacecraft will undock from the Russian segment of the station while attached to the Pirs docking compartment. With Pirs attached, Progress 77 is scheduled to undock at 9:17 a.m. Live coverage of undocking will begin at 8:45 a.m. A few hours later, Progress’ engines will fire in a deorbit maneuver to send the cargo craft and Pirs into a destructive reentry in the Earth’s atmosphere over the Pacific Ocean. Deorbit and reentry will not be covered on NASA TV.

 

After Nauka completes eight days in free-flight to allow Russian flight controllers to evaluate its systems, the 43-foot long, 23-ton module will automatically link up to the port on the Earth-facing side of the Russian segment station, vacated by the departure of Pirs. Docking is scheduled for 9:25 a.m. Thursday, July 29, with live coverage begining at 8:30 a.m.

 

Nauka will serve as a new science facility, docking port, and spacewalk airlock for future operations. Pirs has been part of the space station since September 2001, functioning as a docking port for Russian visiting spacecraft and an airlock for Russian spacewalks.

 

For more than 20 years, astronauts have continuously lived and worked on the space station, testing technologies, performing science, and developing the skills needed to explore farther from Earth. Through NASA’s Artemis program, the agency will send the first woman and the first person of color to the Moon’s surface, and eventually expand human exploration to Mars. Inspiring the next generation of explorers – the Artemis Generation – ensures America will continue to lead in space exploration and discovery.

Quelle: NASA

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Update: 21.07.2021

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Nauka module to be launched to ISS on Wednesday

Further approach to the International Space Station (ISS) will be carried out with the help of Nauka’s own engines
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The Proton-M carrier rocket will be launched on Wednesday from the Baikonur space center in Kazakhstan to deliver Russia’s Nauka multifunctional laboratory module to the low-earth orbit.

"The blastoff is scheduled to take place at 17:58:21 Moscow time on July 21, 2021, from Launch Pad 39 of Site 200," Roscosmos said.

The module will separate from the carrier rocket 580 seconds after the takeoff.

Further approach to the International Space Station (ISS) will be carried out with the help of Nauka’s own engines. The maneuver is expected to take eight days. The docking is scheduled for 16:26 Moscow time on July 29.

Pirs module undocking

Nauka will dock to the slot earlier occupied by the Pirs module. On July 14, Russian cosmonauts carried out a series of operations for the module’s future undocking.

Pirs will depart from the International Space Station on July 23, at 16:17 Moscow time and will splash down in the Pacific Ocean approximately four hours later.

Launch delays

The module’s construction began in 1995. Russia initially planned to launch the Nauka lab to the ISS as a back-up of the Zarya compartment (the station’s first module that continues its flight as part of the orbital outpost) but the launch was numerously delayed. In 2013, the Nauka module was sent to the Khrunichev Space Center after metal chips were found in its fuel system.

At some point, Roscosmos contemplated replacing the research module’s original propellant tanks, manufactured about 18 years ago, with those from the Fregat booster. However, later it was decided to send the module to the ISS with its original tanks.

The Nauka multi-functional laboratory module can generate oxygen for six people and regenerate water from the urine. The Nauka will provide a second toilet for Russian cosmonauts (the first is located in the Zvezda module) and a room for the third crewmember. It will also use the European Robotic Arm (ERA) that will help perform some operations without spacewalks.

On July 1, it was announced that the launch was rescheduled from July 15 to July 21.

Quelle: TASS
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Update: 23.07.2021
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Russian science lab heads for International Space Station

The International Space Station is set to receive its biggest expansion in more than a decade after the launch of a Russian research lab and a European robotic arm Wednesday from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Russia’s Nauka, or “science,” research module lifted on top of a Proton rocket Wednesday to kick off an eight-day pursuit of the space station, culminating in an automated docking with the orbiting outpost July 29.

Roscosmos, the Russian space agency, says the Nauka module has a mass of about 20.2 metric tons (44,500 pounds) and extends about 43 feet (13 meters) long. It’s the first large pressurized element to be permanently added to the space station since  2011, and will become one of the biggest modules at the complex.

The launch from Baikonur occurred at 10:58:25 a.m. EDT (1458:25 GMT; 7:58:25 p.m. local time), about a half-hour before sunset at the historic Russian-managed spaceport in Central Asia.

Rocketing away from Baikonur with 2.5 million pounds of thrust from six main engines, the liquid-fueled Proton launcher headed northeast to line up with the space station’s orbital plane.

The Proton’s first stage shut down two minutes into the flight and fall back to Earth downrange from Baikonur. The rocket’s second and third stages completed their burns to inject the Nauka module into a preliminary orbit between 123 and 233 miles (199 and 376 kilometers) in altitude, Roscosmos said.

Sources said Russian ground teams were evaluating issues on the Nauka module soon after its launch Wednesday, prompting managers to forego the mission’s first planned orbit adjustment burn. The issues were not expected to be a major concern for the module’s rendezvous and docking with the space station.

 

NASA confirmed the Nauka spacecraft, also called the Multipurpose Laboratory Module, unfurled its solar arrays and deployed its Kurs navigation antenna soon after separation from the Proton third stage.

But Russian teams canceled the spacecraft’s first post-launch orbit adjustment burn a few hours after launch. It wasn’t immediately clear if the change to the rendezvous plan might affect the schedule for Nauka’s docking with the space station, which was set for July 29 at 9:25 a.m. EDT (1325 GMT).

The bus-sized Nauka research module has been in development for more than 20 years, originally as a backup for Russia’s Zarya module, the first element of the space station to launch in 1998. Russia said in 2004 that the backup to Zarya would be converted into a lab module for launch in 2007.

But delays have kept the Russian lab on the ground for years. Engineers at Energia, the prime contractor for Russia’s human spaceflight program, found flaws in the module’s propulsion system in 2013. The module was returned to Khrunichev, its manufacturer, for lengthy repairs that delayed Nauka’s launch several more years.

Nauka is the first pressurized module to be added to the space station since the arrival of the small Bigelow Expandable Activity Module in 2016. The last Russian pressurized element of any size launched to the space station was the Rassvet docking module, which was delivered by a NASA space shuttle in 2010.

The Nauka module will dock with the nadir, or Earth-facing, port of the space station’s Russian Zvezda service module. That location has been occupied by the Russian Pirs docking compartment since 2001.

In preparation for docking of the Nauka module, a Russian Progress supply ship is set to carry the Pirs module away from the space station. The Progress spacecraft and Pirs docking compartment were scheduled to detach from the space station at 9:15 a.m. EDT (1315 GMT) Friday, setting up for a destructive re-entry over the Pacific Ocean about four hours later.

But sources said Thursday the undocking of the Progress spacecraft with the Pirs module was delayed one day to Saturday, presumably as a precaution as Russian engineers assess the status of the newly-launched Nauka spacecraft.

Diagram of Russia’s Nauka module. Credit: NASA TV/Spaceflight Now

Between undocking of the Pirs module and the arrival of Nauka next week, ground teams plan to inspect the nadir docking port on the Zvezda module using cameras on the the space station’s Canadian-built robotic arm. The inspection will ensure there’s no debris or obstructions on the docking mechanism, which was last used for a docking when Pirs linked up with the station in 2001.

If teams find any problems, cosmonauts Oleg Novitskiy and Pyotr Dubrov could head outside the space station on a spacewalk next week to clean up the docking system.

After docking of the Nauka module, Russian cosmonauts plan a series of up to 11 spacewalks later this year and early next year to outfit the exterior new lab element.

Once fully operational, Nauka will accommodate dockings of Progress resupply ships, Soyuz crew capsules, and Russia’s new Prichal node module later this year.

Inside Nauka, Russian cosmonauts will install and activate scientific experiments, prepare a new oxygen generation system for operation, set up a new toilet, and ready a new sleeping compartment for an extra Russian crew member on the space station.

The Nauka module also carries the European Robotic Arm, which was completed 15 years ago to await an opportunity to fly to the space station.

This diagram shows the location of the Nauka laboratory module at the European Robotic Arm after docking at the International Space Station. Credit: ESA

Full-scale development of the European Robotic Arm began in 1996, and the arm has been in storage more than a decade. Originally planned for launch on a NASA space shuttle, the 37-foot-long (11.3-meter) arm will join Canadian and Japanese robotic manipulators outside the space station, assisting with the movement of external payloads and helping astronauts with spacewalks.

The launch plan for the robotic arm changed, and the European Space Agency said it was ready to ship the 37-foot-long (11.3-meter) arm to Russia in 2006 for installation on the new Russian MLM science element for launch on a Proton rocket. But the robotic arm was placed in storage in Europe after problem during development of the Nauka module.

“ERA is a bit different than the other manipulators that already on the station,” said Philippe Schoonejansm, ESA’s ERA project manager. “It can be fully preprogrammed in advance, which is helpful. It can be operated from external control panel, which the others do not have. So even when you’re doing a spacewalk, you can control ERA by just seeing and operating this control panel. But also it can operated from inside using only a laptop, so it doesn’t need any joysticks.”

The European Robotic Arm can walk across the Russian segment of the space station. ESA says it’s capable of carrying a load of more than 17,000 pounds, or 8 metric tons, with a precision of one-fifth of an inch (5 millimeters).

Russia’s Nauka module undergoes launch preparations at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Credit: Roscosmos

ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet, who is currently living on the space station, will reform an initial health check of the robotic arm using a computer inside the complex. Then there will be a full motion checkout of the arm to verify it is ready for operation.

Schoonejansm said the firs operational use of the robotic arm will be to install a radiator and an equipment airlock on the Nauka module. ESA astronauts Matthias Maurer and Samantha Cristoforetti, scheduled for launch to the station late this year and early next year, will assist in that work.

Quelle: SN

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Update: 25.07.2021

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Skywatcher spots Russia's Nauka science module headed to space station (photo)

Martin Lewis took the image using his home-built telescope from his home near London.

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British astrophotographer Martin Lewis captured the Russian Nauka module in orbit a few hours after its launch using his home-built telescope.

A British astrophotographer captured a stunning view of Russia's largest addition to the International Space Station yet, the Nauka science module, just hours after its launch into orbit on Wednesday (July 21). 

 

Martin Lewis, who posts his images on the website Skyinspector.co.uk, took the photo shortly after 21:00 UTC (5 pm EDT) on Wednesday (July 21) from his back garden in St. Albans, some 20 miles (35 kilometers) north of London, using his home-built 222mm Dobsonian telescope.

Lewis told Space.com he was preparing to image the passing International Space Station (ISS) on that day and was alerted to the pass of Nauka, also known as the Multipurpose Research Module, by another astrophotographer only at about 20:00 UTC (4 pm EDT). The skywatchers originally expected the module, which had only lifted off Russia's Baikonur Cosmodrome five hours earlier, to pass overhead of their location about seven minutes after the space station. However, they were caught by surprise when the module appeared overhead only two minutes after the station.

"I set up [the telescope] with a 2.7x Barlow lens and 642 nm filter with a large-chipped fast ASI174MM digital video camera," Lewis told Space.com in an email. "I took a stream of video frames of the ISS with 0.7 millisecond exposure, hand-guiding the telescope and keeping the ISS on cross-wires of the finder. Only on finishing the ISS recording did I realise how close behind the Nauka module was."

 

Lewis said he managed to take only "19 good video frames" of Nauka as he "panicked" slightly due to the lack of preparation time. 

While Lewis was scrambling to get his snaps, Nauka ground control teams with Russia's Roscosmos space agency were apparently fighting a more serious battle as it appeared that, shortly after the module's separation from its Proton M rocket, some of its communications and propulsion systems were not working properly. Eventually, engineers managed to correct the issue, commencing Nauka's ascent towards the orbital outpost with a short delay. 

Roscosmos issued a statement on Thursday (July 22), about 24 hours after Nauka’s launch and after much Twitter speculation among space aficionados, that the space station module had successfully fired its engines and performed two orbital correction maneuvers.

The statement also stated that the Pirs docking module, which is now occupying Nauka's slot on the space station, would undock and deorbit on Saturday (July 24), but that has been delayed to Sunday as troubleshooting efforts continue on Nauka. The undocking was originally scheduled to happen on Friday. Nauka is currently expected to dock itself at Pirs' former location at an Earth-facing port of the station's Russian-built Zvezda service module on July 29.

 

Nauka, which represents Russia's so far largest contribution to the International Space Station, was conceived already in the 1990s and remained sitting on the ground for nearly two decades, getting outdated. The module was originally expected to launch in 2007. However, a series of technical problems resulted in a 14 year delay. 

 

The 43-foot (13 meters) Nauka module — its name means "science" in Russian — weighs nearly 23 tons (21 metric tons) and is 14 feet (4.3 m) wide. It is more than just a new research room for the space station, however. 

 

Nauka will add a new space toilet for the station's crew, an extra crew quarters for a Russian cosmonaut, a new oxygen regeneration system and a system for recycling urine into drinking water. The module will also deliver the European Robotic Arm, a 36-foot-long (11 m) appendage for the station built by the European Space Agency. It is the first robotic arm specifically designed to work on the Russian segment of the International Space Station.

Quelle: SC

 

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