Blogarchiv
Raumfahrt - ESA/JAXA BepiColombo Merkur Mission -Update-1

23.10.2018

bepicolombo-som-elsa-montagnon-large-1

Elsa Montagnon
 

BEPICOLOMBO'S BEGINNING ENDS

A stunning early morning launch lifted the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo spacecraft into space on Saturday, 20 October. This marked the start of intensive, round-the-clock flight control activities to ensure the mission’s health and functioning in the harsh environment of space.

At 13:45CEST on Monday 22 October, just 58 hours into its mission, the critical first segment of the fledgeling satellite’s long voyage to Mercury was wrapped up, as teams at ESA’s mission control centre declared the critical ‘launch and early orbit phase’ complete.

BepiColombo liftoff

The end of the beginning now beckons months of extensive in-orbit commissioning activities, in which operations teams will work extended hours daily until the end of December, performing tests to ensure the health of BepiColombo’s science instruments, its propulsion and other systems.

“Lots of people think you point a spacecraft in a particular direction and off it goes, making its own way to its final destination,” says Elsa Montagnon, Spacecraft Operations Manager for BepiColombo.

“In reality, the post-launch period is extremely busy, and so, too, is the long interplanetary cruise.”

“In the next months, teams on ground will be working in 12-hour shifts, including weekends, to get the spacecraft on the right path to the smallest planet of our Solar System.”

All systems GO

Andrea Accomazzo

In the hours before Saturday’s liftoff, the Main Control Room of ESA’s ESOC operations centre was centre stage for the network countdown — a synchronised sequence involving facilities at ESOC, Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, and at ground stations on four continents supporting the launch.

The final GO/NOGO rollcall saw Flight Director Andrea Accomazzo check in with the flight controllers at ESOC, each confirming they were “go for launch".

Shortly after, at 3:45 CEST on 20 October, BepiColombo hitched a ride into space on top of an Ariane 5 rocket, which provided a flawless orbit injection onto the planned interplanetary transfer trajectory.

Separation after launch

Booster separation came just two minutes later, as the Ariane 5’s two solid rocket boosters detached themselves from the core stage; later, BepiColombo began its solo flight upon separation from the Ariane upper stage at around 4:12 CEST.

“Years of planning, and months of training and simulations led up to these fast-paced and vital moments,” recalls Elsa.

“Even after a successful liftoff and separation, we couldn’t relax. Everyone was waiting for the moment we heard BepiColombo’s first call, what we call the ‘Acquisition of Signal’.”

At 04:20 CEST, ESA’s deep space tracking station at New Norcia, Western Australia, picked up these first signals, followed by a rush of ‘telemetry’ — real-time status information and data — which was the first chance teams on the ground had to verify how the spacecraft was adapting to its new environment.

Next stop, Mercury

BepiColombo’s first image from space

Since then, BepiColombo has not only communicated bundles of engineering telemetry, but its Mercury Transfer Module has also sent home spectacular images from a series of three low-resolution monitoring cameras, known as the “Selfie-cams.”

These images allowed flight controllers to visually verify the correct deployment of solar arrays and antennas.

Having worked around the clock since the launch of this remarkable mission, teams at ESA’s control centre in Germany are tired, but happy.

“The launch and early orbit phase was a huge success, but now comes seven years of complex operations as BepiColombo travels nine billion km to the innermost planet of the Solar System,” explains Paolo Ferri, Head of Mission Operations at ESA.

“The first ion thruster ‘operational arc’ will begin in mid-December, steering BepiColombo on its interplanetary trajectory.”

In an 'operational arc', the spacecraft's ion thruster runs at low energies for extended periods of hours and days, as opposed to traditional, high-energy chemical thruster burns that run for just minutes or hours. The benefit of an arc is it provides the same acceleration with less fuel mass.

Paolo continues, “With the combined experience from experts in operations, flight dynamics, mission data systems and deep space ground stations, BepiColombo could not be in more reliable hands.”

Quelle: ESA

----

Update: 6.12.2018

. 

BEPICOLOMBO NOW FIRING ON ALL CYLINDERS

bepicolombo-approaching-mercury-large

BepiColombo, the joint ESA/JAXA spacecraft on a mission to Mercury, is now firing its thrusters for the first time in flight.

On Sunday, BepiColombo carried out the first successful manoeuver using two of its four electric propulsion thrusters. After more than a week of testing which saw each thruster individually and meticulously put through its paces, the intrepid explorer is now one step closer to reaching the innermost planet of the Solar System.

Twin ion thrusters firing

BepiColombo left Earth on 20 October 2018, and after the first few critical days in space and the initial weeks of in-orbit commissioning, its Mercury Transfer Module (MTM) is now revving up the high-tech ion thrusters.

The most powerful and high-performance electric propulsion system ever flown, these electric blue thrusters had not been tested in space until now.

It is these glowing power-packs that will propel the two science orbiters – the Mercury Planetary Orbiter and Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter – on the seven-year cruise to the least explored planet of the inner Solar System.

“Electric propulsion technology is very novel and extremely delicate,” explains Elsa Montagnon, Spacecraft Operations Manager for BepiColombo.

“This means BepiColombo’s four thrusters had to be thoroughly checked following the launch, by slowly turning each on, one by one, and closely monitoring their functioning and effect on the spacecraft.”

BepiColombo images high-gain antenna

Testing took place during a unique window, in which BepiColombo remained in continuous view of ground-based antennas and communications between the spacecraft and those controlling it could be constantly maintained.

This was the only chance to check in detail the functioning of this fundamental part of the spacecraft, as when routine firing begins in mid-December, the position of the spacecraft will mean its antennas will not be pointing at Earth, making it less visible to operators at mission control.

The first fire

On 20 November at 11:33 UTC (12:33 CET), the first of BepiColombo’s thrusters entered Thrust Mode with a force of 75 mN (millinewtons). With this BepiColombo was firing in space for the very first time.

Three hours later, the newly awakened thruster was really put through its paces as commands from mission control directed it to go full throttle, ramping up to 125mN – equivalent to holding an AAA battery at sea level.

This may not sound like much, but this thruster was now working at the maximum thrust planned to be used during the life of the mission.

Views of ESA's 35m ESTRACK deep-space tracking station at Malargüe, Argentina, now supporting many of the Agency's most important exploration missions, including Rosetta, Mars Express, ExoMars, LISA Pathfinder and Gaia.
ESA Malargüe tracking station

Thrust mode was maintained for five hours before BepiColombo transitioned back to Normal Mode. The entire time, ESA’s Malargüe antenna in Argentina was in communication with the now glowing blue spacecraft – the colour of the plasma generated by the thruster as it burned through the xenon propellant.

These steps were then repeated for each of the other three thrusters over the next days, having only a tiny effect on BepiColombo’s overall trajectory.

The small effects that were observed allowed the Flight Dynamics team to assess the thruster performance in precise detail: analysis of the first two firings reveals that the spacecraft was performing within 2% of its expected value. Analysis of the last two firings is ongoing.

Twenty-two arcs to go

 
 
 
 
Animation visualising BepiColombo’s journey to Mercury

“To see the thrusters working for the first time in space was an exciting moment and a big relief. BepiColombo’s seven year trip to Mercury will include 22 ion thrust arcs – and we absolutely need healthy and well performing thrusters for this long trip,” explains Paolo Ferri, ESA’s Head of Operations.

“Each thruster burn arc will last for extended periods of up to two months, providing the same acceleration from less fuel compared to traditional, high-energy chemical burns that last for minutes or hours.”

During each long-duration burn the engines do take eight hour pauses, once a week, to allow the ground to perform navigation measurements in quiet dynamic conditions.

The first routine electric propulsion thrust arc will begin in mid-December, steering BepiColombo on its interplanetary trajectory and optimising its orbit ahead of its swing-by of Earth in April 2020.

BepiColombo Earth flyby

Travelling some nine billion kilometers in total, BepiColombo will take nine flybys at Earth, Venus and Mercury, looping around the Sun 18 times.

By late 2025 the transfer module’s work will be done: it will separate, allowing the two science orbiters to be captured by Mercury’s gravity, studying the planet and its environment, along with its interaction with the solar wind, from complementary orbits.

"We put our trust in the thrusters and they have not let us down. We are now on our way to Mercury with electro-mobility,” concludes Günther Hasinger, ESA Director of Science.

“This brings us an important step closer to unlocking the secrets of the mysterious innermost planet and ultimately, the formation of our Solar System.”

Follow ESA Operations on twitter for updates on BepiColombo’s journey, as well as the latest from ESA’s mission control.

Quelle: ESA

----

Update: 17.12.2018

. 

DEM MERKUR ENTGEGEN

BepiColombo – ESA's first mission to Mercury – will be conducted in cooperation with Japan. ESA's Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) will be operated from ESOC, Germany
BepiColombo

 

Mit BepiColombo wagt sich die Europäische Raumfahrtagentur ESA an ihre anspruchsvollste interplanetare Mission. Denn der Merkur ist ein extremer Geselle. Nur 58 Millionen Kilometer von der Sonne entfernt (bei der Erde sind es rund 150 Millionen Kilometer), ist er deren Unbilden stark ausgesetzt. Tagsüber werden auf seiner Oberfläche bis zu 430 Grad Celsius und nachts bis zu minus 173 Grad Celsius erreicht. Er hat nur eine Umlaufzeit von 88 Tagen um die Sonne und eine stark exzentrische Umlaufbahn. Während zweier Sonnenumläufe dreht er sich nur dreimal um seine Achse, so dass die Zeit zwischen zwei Sonnenaufgängen an jedem beliebigen Punkt knapp 176 Tage beträgt. Mit 4878 Kilometern Durchmesser ist der Merkur wesentlich kleiner als unser Heimatplanet (12.742 Kilometer) und damit auch der kleinste in unserem Sonnensystem. Die hohen Temperaturen und die geringe Anziehungskraft führen dazu, dass er keine Atmosphäre hat. Aufgrund der Sonnennähe kann er von der Erde aus nur schwer beobachtet werden.

Merkur hatte selten Besuch

Merkur-Aufnahme der amerikanischen Messenger-Sonde

Die unwirtlichen Bedingungen und die sonnennahe Umlaufbahn sind auch der Grund dafür, dass der Merkur bisher nur zweimal Besuch von irdischen Raumsonden hatte, nämlich den beiden US-Raumflugkörpern Mariner 10 und Messenger. Er ist deshalb auch einer der am wenigsten erforschten Planeten unseres Sonnensystems. Mariner 10 wurde am 3. November 1973 gestartet und passierte den Merkur erstmals am 16. März 1974. Es folgten zwei weitere Passagen 1974 und 1975. Insgesamt lieferte die Sonde 4.165 Bilder und erfasste damit 45 Prozent der Oberfläche. Messenger (Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging) wurde am 18. März 2011 in eine Umlaufbahn um den Planeten gebracht und beendete die Mission am 30. April 2015, als sie nach dem Verbrauch des letzten Treibstoffes auf der Merkuroberfläche aufschlug. Eine Vielzahl von Kameras und Instrumenten untersuchte die geochemische Zusammensetzung, die geologische Geschichte des Merkurs, den Planetenkern sowie die Polkappen. Es gelang die vollständige Kartierung der Oberfläche.

Für den Erfolg der beiden Missionen waren komplizierte Bahnmanöver nötig. Erstmals in der Geschichte der Raumfahrt vollführte Mariner 10 ein Swingby-Manöver an der Venus. Bei einem solchen Manöver wird das Gravitationsfeld eines Planeten genutzt, um einem wesentlich kleineren Raumflugkörper eine Richtungsänderung, eine Beschleunigung oder eine Abbremsung mitzugeben. Damit Sonden in die Nähe des Merkurs gelangen, muss man deren Fluggeschwindigkeit nach dem Start mit solchen Manövern um etwa 60 Prozent verringern. Die erste derartige Flugbahn wurde von dem italienischen Ingenieur und Mathematiker Giuseppe „Bepi“ Colombo für Mariner 10 vorgeschlagen, der auch wesentlich an der Planung der amerikanischen Mission beteiligt war.

Neun Swingby-Manöver

BepiColombo timeline

Zu seinen Ehren erhielt die von der ESA und der japanischen Raumfahrtagentur JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) entwickelte Merkursonde den Namen BepiColombo, wobei die ESA bei dem Unternehmen die Federführung hat. Das 1,3 Milliarden Euro teure Gerät soll im Oktober 2018 mit einer Ariane 5 ECA von Kourou aus gestartet werden. Nach ca. eineinhalb Jahren erfolgt ein Swingby-Manöver an der Erde. Diesem werden neben der Abbremsung durch die elektrischen Triebwerke der Sonde acht Swingby-Manöver (zwei an der Venus und sechs am Merkur) folgen. 2025 hat BepiColombo schließlich genügend Schwung verloren, um die beiden Orbiter von einer Transferstufe abzutrennen, die dann ihren jeweils eigenen Orbit um den Merkur erreichen. Nach einer finalen Überprüfung aller Instrumente und Systeme kann dann die eigentliche Arbeit beginnen, die für ein Erdenjahr geplant ist, mit der Option auf ein weiteres Forschungsjahr.

Damit werden erstmals zwei Raumsonden gleichzeitig den Merkur und seine Umgebung erforschen. Die wissenschaftliche Zielstellung ist entsprechend komplex, denn es geht um eine Reihe spannender Fragen. Kameras sollen die Oberfläche genauer als bisher kartographieren, ein hochgenaues Laseraltimeter liefert ergänzende Höheninformationen und aus der Auswertung der Daten aller wissenschaftlichen Instrumente erhoffen sich die Forscher Antworten auf die geologische und chemische Zusammensetzung, den Aufbau des Planeten (Ist der Kern flüssig oder fest?) und vor allem auf die Eigenschaften des Magnetfeldes und seine Interaktion mit dem Sonnenwind. Die Daten sollen auch mehr Licht in die Entstehung und Entwicklung der inneren Planeten einschließlich der Erde bringen. Und man mag es kaum glauben, Messenger konnte in dauerhaft beschatteten Kratern der Polarregionen Schwefel und gar Wassereis nachweisen. Gelingt es BepiColombo, diese Messungen an solch exotischen Orten zu bestätigen?

Ein besonders spannendes Thema ist der Nachweis von Einsteins allgemeiner Relativitätstheorie. Durch die gravitative Störung der anderen Planeten auf das Zweikörpersystem Sonne-Merkur führt die große Bahnachse der Merkurbahn eine Drehung in der Bahnebene aus, und zwar um 5,74 Bogensekunden pro Jahr. Mit der klassischen Newtonschen Mechanik lässt sich dieser Wert aber nicht erklären. Erst die Einbeziehung der in der allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie vorhergesagten Raum-Zeit-Krümmung lieferte eine mit dem gemessenen Wert gute Übereinstimmung. BepiColombo soll nun die Bewegung des Merkurs mit bisher unerreichter Genauigkeit vermessen und damit einen Beitrag zur Überprüfung der allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie leisten.

Der Flug in einen Backofen

BepiColombo Ionentriebwerk

BepiColombo ist eigentlich ein Gerätetrio, bestehend aus der Transferstufe MTM (Mercury Transport Module), der europäischen Sonde MPO (Mercury Planetary Orbiter) und dem japanischen Orbiter MMO (Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter). Die beiden Orbiter sind während des Hinfluges auf dem MTM montiert (oben der MMO). Das gesamte Gerät wiegt über 4100 Kilogramm beim Start. Die größte Herausforderung bei der Konstruktion der Sonde war die intensive Wärmeeinstrahlung von der Sonne und des Merkur, der die eingefangene Sonnenwärme wieder als Infrarotstrahlung abgibt. Aus diesen Quellen bekommt vor allem der europäische Orbiter etwa 20 Kilowatt pro Quadratmeter ab. Das ist, als würde man das Gerät in einen Backofen stecken. BepiColombo hat daher einen Hitzeschild (MOSIF – MMO Sunshield and Interface Structure), der den MMO während der Anflugphase schützt und ihn mit dem MPO verbindet. In der Merkurumlaufbahn besteht keine Gefahr der Überhitzung, da MMO dort um seine Längsachse rotiert. Der MPO ist durch einen mehrlagigen Schild aus verschiedenen Materialien geschützt. Die trotzdem noch eindringende Wärme wird über einen Radiator aus dem Innern der Sonde abgeführt.

Die zentrale Antriebseinheit ist während des Anflugs die Transferstufe MTM. Sie besitzt zwei Antriebssysteme, ein chemisches und vier elektrische Ionentriebwerke. Das chemische System ist für schnelle Bahnänderungen verantwortlich, während die Ionenantriebe für das Abbremsen der Gerätekombination in Richtung Merkurbahn zuständig sind. Zur Stromversorgung werden Solarzellenpaneele, die am MTM und am MPO montiert sind, eingesetzt.

16 Instrumente liefern Daten

BepiColombo industrial partners

Der MPO bewegt sich auf einer polaren Umlaufbahn mit 480 mal 1500 Kilometern. An Bord befinden sich 11 Kameras und Instrumente (siehe Kasten). An vier Instrumenten sind auch Forschungseinrichtungen Deutschlands, wie das DLR, das Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung oder die Universitäten Braunschweig und Münster beteiligt. Und Airbus Defense and Space in Immenstaad am Bodensee ist verantwortlich für die Konstruktion und den Bau von MTM und MPO.

Wie der Name schon verrät, wird der japanische MMO das Magnetfeld des Planeten und seine Wechselwirkungen mit der Umgebung untersuchen. Die Sonde ist kleiner als der MPO und hat fünf Instrumente an Bord (siehe unten). Ihre polare Bahn soll bei 590 mal 11.640 Kilometern liegen.

 

Geplant ist, 1550 Gigabit Daten im ersten Missionsjahr vom MPO zur Erde zu übertragen. Primäre Empfangsstation wird die 35 Meter-Antenne der ESA bei Cebreros (Spanien) sein. Die Daten des MMO werden von einer japanischen Bodenstation empfangen.

Bei der Planung und Realisierung des Projektes waren viele unvorhergesehene technische Lösungen zu finden, was zu einer jahrelangen Verzögerung führte. Nun werden die letzten Tests und Vorbereitungen getroffen. Übrigens: Am Gelingen der Mission sind 83 Firmen aus 16 Ländern beteiligt, ein wahrhaft gigantisches Unternehmen.

Wissenschaftliche Instrumente der Orbiter

MPO
MPO Instrumente
Laseraltimeter BELA (BepiColombo Laser Altimeter)
Beschleunigungsmesser ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer)
Magnetometer MERMAG (Mercury Magnetometer)
Infrarotspektrometer MERTIS-TIS (Mercury Thermal Infrared Spectrometer)
Gammastrahlen- und Neutronenspektrometer MGNS (Mercury Gamma ray and Neutron Spectrometer)
Röntgenspektrometer MIXS (Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer)
Radio Science MORE (Mercury Orbiter Radio science Experiment)
Ultraviolettspektrometer PHEBUS (Probing of Hermean Exosphere by Ultraviolet Spectroscopy)
Analysator für geladene und neutrale Partikel SERENA (Search for Exosphere Refilling and Emitted Neutral Abundances)
Stereokamera und optischesNahinfrarot-Spektrometer SIMBIO-SYS (Spectrometers and Imagers for MPO BepiColombo Integrated Observatory System)
Solares Röntgenspektrometer SIXS (Solar Intensity X-ray Spectrometer)

 

 

MMO

 

Magnetometer MERMAG-M/MGF (Mercury Magnetometer)
Plasmapartikel-Experiment MPPE (Mercury Plasma Particle Experiment)
Plasmawellen-Experiment PWI (Plasma Wave Instrument)
Natriumatmosphären-Instrument SASI (Mercury Sodium Atmospheric Spectral Imager)
Staub-Analysator MDM (Mercury Dust Monitor)
MMO

Der Originalartikel erschien in der Printausgabe der Flugrevue 12/2017.

Quelle: ESA

+++

bepicolombo-s-first-space-selfies-node-full-image-2

 

DEM MERKUR ENTGEGEN

BepiColombo – ESA's first mission to Mercury – will be conducted in cooperation with Japan. ESA's Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) will be operated from ESOC, Germany
BepiColombo
3 Januar 2018

Im Oktober 2018 soll die europäisch-japanische Raumsonde BepiColombo zum innersten Planeten unseres Sonnensystems starten. Nach der Ankunft werden Ende 2025 je ein europäischer und japanischer Orbiter den Merkur umkreisen und ihn mindestens ein Jahr unter die Lupe nehmen.

Mit BepiColombo wagt sich die Europäische Raumfahrtagentur ESA an ihre anspruchsvollste interplanetare Mission. Denn der Merkur ist ein extremer Geselle. Nur 58 Millionen Kilometer von der Sonne entfernt (bei der Erde sind es rund 150 Millionen Kilometer), ist er deren Unbilden stark ausgesetzt. Tagsüber werden auf seiner Oberfläche bis zu 430 Grad Celsius und nachts bis zu minus 173 Grad Celsius erreicht. Er hat nur eine Umlaufzeit von 88 Tagen um die Sonne und eine stark exzentrische Umlaufbahn. Während zweier Sonnenumläufe dreht er sich nur dreimal um seine Achse, so dass die Zeit zwischen zwei Sonnenaufgängen an jedem beliebigen Punkt knapp 176 Tage beträgt. Mit 4878 Kilometern Durchmesser ist der Merkur wesentlich kleiner als unser Heimatplanet (12.742 Kilometer) und damit auch der kleinste in unserem Sonnensystem. Die hohen Temperaturen und die geringe Anziehungskraft führen dazu, dass er keine Atmosphäre hat. Aufgrund der Sonnennähe kann er von der Erde aus nur schwer beobachtet werden.

Merkur hatte selten Besuch

Merkur-Aufnahme der amerikanischen Messenger-Sonde

Die unwirtlichen Bedingungen und die sonnennahe Umlaufbahn sind auch der Grund dafür, dass der Merkur bisher nur zweimal Besuch von irdischen Raumsonden hatte, nämlich den beiden US-Raumflugkörpern Mariner 10 und Messenger. Er ist deshalb auch einer der am wenigsten erforschten Planeten unseres Sonnensystems. Mariner 10 wurde am 3. November 1973 gestartet und passierte den Merkur erstmals am 16. März 1974. Es folgten zwei weitere Passagen 1974 und 1975. Insgesamt lieferte die Sonde 4.165 Bilder und erfasste damit 45 Prozent der Oberfläche. Messenger (Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging) wurde am 18. März 2011 in eine Umlaufbahn um den Planeten gebracht und beendete die Mission am 30. April 2015, als sie nach dem Verbrauch des letzten Treibstoffes auf der Merkuroberfläche aufschlug. Eine Vielzahl von Kameras und Instrumenten untersuchte die geochemische Zusammensetzung, die geologische Geschichte des Merkurs, den Planetenkern sowie die Polkappen. Es gelang die vollständige Kartierung der Oberfläche.

Für den Erfolg der beiden Missionen waren komplizierte Bahnmanöver nötig. Erstmals in der Geschichte der Raumfahrt vollführte Mariner 10 ein Swingby-Manöver an der Venus. Bei einem solchen Manöver wird das Gravitationsfeld eines Planeten genutzt, um einem wesentlich kleineren Raumflugkörper eine Richtungsänderung, eine Beschleunigung oder eine Abbremsung mitzugeben. Damit Sonden in die Nähe des Merkurs gelangen, muss man deren Fluggeschwindigkeit nach dem Start mit solchen Manövern um etwa 60 Prozent verringern. Die erste derartige Flugbahn wurde von dem italienischen Ingenieur und Mathematiker Giuseppe „Bepi“ Colombo für Mariner 10 vorgeschlagen, der auch wesentlich an der Planung der amerikanischen Mission beteiligt war.

Neun Swingby-Manöver

BepiColombo timeline

Zu seinen Ehren erhielt die von der ESA und der japanischen Raumfahrtagentur JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) entwickelte Merkursonde den Namen BepiColombo, wobei die ESA bei dem Unternehmen die Federführung hat. Das 1,3 Milliarden Euro teure Gerät soll im Oktober 2018 mit einer Ariane 5 ECA von Kourou aus gestartet werden. Nach ca. eineinhalb Jahren erfolgt ein Swingby-Manöver an der Erde. Diesem werden neben der Abbremsung durch die elektrischen Triebwerke der Sonde acht Swingby-Manöver (zwei an der Venus und sechs am Merkur) folgen. 2025 hat BepiColombo schließlich genügend Schwung verloren, um die beiden Orbiter von einer Transferstufe abzutrennen, die dann ihren jeweils eigenen Orbit um den Merkur erreichen. Nach einer finalen Überprüfung aller Instrumente und Systeme kann dann die eigentliche Arbeit beginnen, die für ein Erdenjahr geplant ist, mit der Option auf ein weiteres Forschungsjahr.

Damit werden erstmals zwei Raumsonden gleichzeitig den Merkur und seine Umgebung erforschen. Die wissenschaftliche Zielstellung ist entsprechend komplex, denn es geht um eine Reihe spannender Fragen. Kameras sollen die Oberfläche genauer als bisher kartographieren, ein hochgenaues Laseraltimeter liefert ergänzende Höheninformationen und aus der Auswertung der Daten aller wissenschaftlichen Instrumente erhoffen sich die Forscher Antworten auf die geologische und chemische Zusammensetzung, den Aufbau des Planeten (Ist der Kern flüssig oder fest?) und vor allem auf die Eigenschaften des Magnetfeldes und seine Interaktion mit dem Sonnenwind. Die Daten sollen auch mehr Licht in die Entstehung und Entwicklung der inneren Planeten einschließlich der Erde bringen. Und man mag es kaum glauben, Messenger konnte in dauerhaft beschatteten Kratern der Polarregionen Schwefel und gar Wassereis nachweisen. Gelingt es BepiColombo, diese Messungen an solch exotischen Orten zu bestätigen?

Ein besonders spannendes Thema ist der Nachweis von Einsteins allgemeiner Relativitätstheorie. Durch die gravitative Störung der anderen Planeten auf das Zweikörpersystem Sonne-Merkur führt die große Bahnachse der Merkurbahn eine Drehung in der Bahnebene aus, und zwar um 5,74 Bogensekunden pro Jahr. Mit der klassischen Newtonschen Mechanik lässt sich dieser Wert aber nicht erklären. Erst die Einbeziehung der in der allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie vorhergesagten Raum-Zeit-Krümmung lieferte eine mit dem gemessenen Wert gute Übereinstimmung. BepiColombo soll nun die Bewegung des Merkurs mit bisher unerreichter Genauigkeit vermessen und damit einen Beitrag zur Überprüfung der allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie leisten.

Der Flug in einen Backofen

BepiColombo Ionentriebwerk

BepiColombo ist eigentlich ein Gerätetrio, bestehend aus der Transferstufe MTM (Mercury Transport Module), der europäischen Sonde MPO (Mercury Planetary Orbiter) und dem japanischen Orbiter MMO (Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter). Die beiden Orbiter sind während des Hinfluges auf dem MTM montiert (oben der MMO). Das gesamte Gerät wiegt über 4100 Kilogramm beim Start. Die größte Herausforderung bei der Konstruktion der Sonde war die intensive Wärmeeinstrahlung von der Sonne und des Merkur, der die eingefangene Sonnenwärme wieder als Infrarotstrahlung abgibt. Aus diesen Quellen bekommt vor allem der europäische Orbiter etwa 20 Kilowatt pro Quadratmeter ab. Das ist, als würde man das Gerät in einen Backofen stecken. BepiColombo hat daher einen Hitzeschild (MOSIF – MMO Sunshield and Interface Structure), der den MMO während der Anflugphase schützt und ihn mit dem MPO verbindet. In der Merkurumlaufbahn besteht keine Gefahr der Überhitzung, da MMO dort um seine Längsachse rotiert. Der MPO ist durch einen mehrlagigen Schild aus verschiedenen Materialien geschützt. Die trotzdem noch eindringende Wärme wird über einen Radiator aus dem Innern der Sonde abgeführt.

Die zentrale Antriebseinheit ist während des Anflugs die Transferstufe MTM. Sie besitzt zwei Antriebssysteme, ein chemisches und vier elektrische Ionentriebwerke. Das chemische System ist für schnelle Bahnänderungen verantwortlich, während die Ionenantriebe für das Abbremsen der Gerätekombination in Richtung Merkurbahn zuständig sind. Zur Stromversorgung werden Solarzellenpaneele, die am MTM und am MPO montiert sind, eingesetzt.

16 Instrumente liefern Daten

BepiColombo industrial partners

Der MPO bewegt sich auf einer polaren Umlaufbahn mit 480 mal 1500 Kilometern. An Bord befinden sich 11 Kameras und Instrumente (siehe Kasten). An vier Instrumenten sind auch Forschungseinrichtungen Deutschlands, wie das DLR, das Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung oder die Universitäten Braunschweig und Münster beteiligt. Und Airbus Defense and Space in Immenstaad am Bodensee ist verantwortlich für die Konstruktion und den Bau von MTM und MPO.

Wie der Name schon verrät, wird der japanische MMO das Magnetfeld des Planeten und seine Wechselwirkungen mit der Umgebung untersuchen. Die Sonde ist kleiner als der MPO und hat fünf Instrumente an Bord (siehe unten). Ihre polare Bahn soll bei 590 mal 11.640 Kilometern liegen.

 

Geplant ist, 1550 Gigabit Daten im ersten Missionsjahr vom MPO zur Erde zu übertragen. Primäre Empfangsstation wird die 35 Meter-Antenne der ESA bei Cebreros (Spanien) sein. Die Daten des MMO werden von einer japanischen Bodenstation empfangen.

Bei der Planung und Realisierung des Projektes waren viele unvorhergesehene technische Lösungen zu finden, was zu einer jahrelangen Verzögerung führte. Nun werden die letzten Tests und Vorbereitungen getroffen. Übrigens: Am Gelingen der Mission sind 83 Firmen aus 16 Ländern beteiligt, ein wahrhaft gigantisches Unternehmen.

Wissenschaftliche Instrumente der Orbiter

MPO
MPO Instrumente
Laseraltimeter BELA (BepiColombo Laser Altimeter)
Beschleunigungsmesser ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer)
Magnetometer MERMAG (Mercury Magnetometer)
Infrarotspektrometer MERTIS-TIS (Mercury Thermal Infrared Spectrometer)
Gammastrahlen- und Neutronenspektrometer MGNS (Mercury Gamma ray and Neutron Spectrometer)
Röntgenspektrometer MIXS (Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer)
Radio Science MORE (Mercury Orbiter Radio science Experiment)
Ultraviolettspektrometer PHEBUS (Probing of Hermean Exosphere by Ultraviolet Spectroscopy)
Analysator für geladene und neutrale Partikel SERENA (Search for Exosphere Refilling and Emitted Neutral Abundances)
Stereokamera und optischesNahinfrarot-Spektrometer SIMBIO-SYS (Spectrometers and Imagers for MPO BepiColombo Integrated Observatory System)
Solares Röntgenspektrometer SIXS (Solar Intensity X-ray Spectrometer)

 

 

MMO

 

Magnetometer MERMAG-M/MGF (Mercury Magnetometer)
Plasmapartikel-Experiment MPPE (Mercury Plasma Particle Experiment)
Plasmawellen-Experiment PWI (Plasma Wave Instrument)
Natriumatmosphären-Instrument SASI (Mercury Sodium Atmospheric Spectral Imager)
Staub-Analysator MDM (Mercury Dust Monitor)
 

Quelle: ESA

bepicolombo-s-first-space-selfies-node-full-image-2-1

This trio of images was captured by the BepiColombo spacecraft after it blasted off into space at 01:45 GMT on 20 October on its seven year cruise to Mercury, the innermost planet of the Solar System.

In the hours immediately after launch, critical operations took place, including deployments of the solar wings and antennas. The Mercury Transfer Module (MTM) has two 15 m-long solar arrays that will be used to generate power, while the antennas onboard ESA’s Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) are needed to communicate with Earth, and eventually to transmit science data. The deployments were all confirmed by telemetry sent by the spacecraft to ESA’s mission control centre in Darmstadt, Germany.

The transfer module is also equipped with three monitoring cameras – or ‘M-CAMs’ – which provide black-and-white snapshots in 1024 x 1024 pixel resolution. The M-CAM 1 camera imaged one of the deployed solar wings of the transfer module (left), while M-CAM 2 and M-CAM 3 captured the medium- and high-gain antennas on the MPO (centre, and right, respectively), along with other structural elements of the spacecraft. 

Click here for an infographic showing the locations of the cameras onboard the MTM together with the new images.

The monitoring cameras will be used on various occasions during the cruise phase, notably during the flybys of Earth, Venus and Mercury. While the MPO is equipped with a high-resolution scientific camera, this can only be operated after separating from the MTM upon arrival at Mercury in late 2025 because, like several of the 11 instrument suites, it is located on the side of the spacecraft fixed to the MTM during cruise.

JAXA’s Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter sits inside a protective sunshield on ‘top’ of the MPO, and cannot be seen in these images.

BepiColombo is a joint endeavour between ESA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA. It is the first European mission to Mercury, the smallest and least explored planet in the inner Solar System, and the first to send two spacecraft to make com

bepicolombo-magnetometer-boom-deployed---gif-sequence-node-full-image-2

Quelle: ESA

878 Views