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Raumfahrt - Vorbereitung für Start von ISS-Crew 47
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2.01.2016

NASA will host a news conference for the next crew launching to the International Space Station, featuring NASA astronaut Jeff Williams, on Thursday, Jan. 7, 2016, at the agency's Johnson Space Center in Houston. NASA Television will broadcast the news conference live at 2 p.m. EST after airing b-roll video of crew training at 1:30 p.m. Both can be seen online at: NASA-TV

This will be Williams' third long-duration stay on the space station. Joining him for Expedition 47 and 48 will be cosmonauts Alexey Ovchinin and Oleg Skripochka of Roscosmos (Russian Federal Space Agency). Williams will be the commander of Expedition 48.
Immediately after the news conference, all three crew members will be available for individual media interviews in person or by phone. To request credentials to attend, or to reserve an interview opportunity, U.S. media must contact the Johnson newsroom at 281-483-5111 by 6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 5.
Reporters who wish to participate in the news conference by telephone must contact the newsroom at least 10 minutes prior to its start. Those following the briefing on social media may ask questions using the hashtag #askNASA.
The trio will launch to the space station aboard a Soyuz TMA-20M spacecraft March 18, 2016, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to join Expedition 47 Commander Tim Kopra of NASA, astronaut Timothy Peake of ESA (European Space Agency), and cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko of Roscosmos.
During their six-month mission, the expedition crew members will facilitate approximately 250 research investigations and technology demonstrations not possible on Earth to advance scientific knowledge of Earth, space, physical, and biological sciences and benefit those on Earth. Science conducted also will enable future long-duration human and robotic exploration into deep space and on the agency's journey to Mars.
The crew members are expected to be at the station for arrivals of American cargo spacecraft the SpaceX Dragon and Orbital ATK Cygnus. Williams can expect to enter the deployed Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM), a demonstration of expandable habitat technology that will be attached to the station for two years. During his time in space, the first International Docking Adapter to enable the arrival of future U.S. commercial crew spacecraft will be installed.
This mission will be Williams' fourth spaceflight and third long-duration stay on the orbiting laboratory -- a first for an American – and will be his first return to the station since its completion in 2011. Williams served as the flight engineer and lead spacewalker for the space shuttle Atlantis STS-101 mission in 2000. He was a flight engineer for Expedition 13 in 2006, when the station only had two modules and three crew members. In 2009 and 2010, he served as a flight engineer on Expedition 21 and commanded Expedition 22, when the Tranquility module and cupola were added to the station. During that mission, he also conducted the first live interaction with the agency's social media fans and followers.
During his three flights, Williams spent 19 hours conducting three spacewalks and logged 362 days in space. By the completion of this 172-day mission, Williams will become the American with the most cumulative days in space, 534 overall, surpassing Expedition 46 Commander Scott Kelly, who is about three quarters of the way through a one-year mission that will culminate in 520 total days in space.
Born in Superior, Wisconsin, Williams considers Winter, Wisconsin, to be his hometown. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Applied Science and Engineering from the U.S. Military Academy (USMA) in 1980, a Master of Science in Aeronautical Engineering and the degree of Aeronautical Engineer from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, both in 1987, a Master of Arts in National Security and Strategic Studies from the U.S. Naval War College in 1996, and an honorary Doctorate of Business Administration from Johnson and Wales University in 2007.
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JEFFREY N. WILLIAMS (COLONEL, U.S. ARMY, RETIRED) NASA ASTRONAUT
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PERSONAL DATA: Born January 18, 1958, in Superior, Wisconsin, but considers Winter, Wisconsin to be his hometown. Married to the former Anna-Marie Moore of Newburgh, New York. They have two adult sons, two daughters-in-law, and three grandchildren. Enjoys running, fishing, camping, skiing, scuba diving and woodworking. Williams’ parents, Lloyd D. and Eunice A. Williams, are deceased.
EDUCATION: Graduated from Winter High School, Winter, Wisconsin, in 1976;
received
a Bachelor of Science Degree in Applied Science and Engineering from the U.S. Military
Academy (USMA) in 1980, a Master of Science Degree in Aeronautical Engineering and
the Degree of Aeronautical Engineer from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, both in 1987, a Master of Arts Degree in National Security and Strategic Studies from the U.S. Naval War College in 1996, and an honorary Doctorate of Business Administration from Johnson and Wales University in 2007.
ORGANIZATIONS: Society of Experimental Test Pilots, Association of Space Explorers, Army Aviation Association of America, USMA Association of Graduates, Officer Christian Fellowship.
SPECIAL HONORS: Graduated first in U.S. Naval Test Pilot School class 103 in 1993; Admiral William Adger Moffett Award for Excellence in Aeronautical Engineering in 1988, Naval Postgraduate School; Daedalian Foundation Fellowship Award for Graduate Study in Aeronautics in 1985. Awarded two Defense Superior Service Medals, two Legions of Merit, two Meritorious Service Medals, the Army Commendation Medal, three NASA Space Flight Medals, NASA Distinguished Service and Exceptional Service Medals, and various other service awards along with Master Army Aviator, Senior Space and Parachutist badges.
MILITARY EXPERIENCE: As a cadet at USMA, Williams competed on the West Point sport parachute team and also held ratings of sport parachute jumpmaster and instructor. He received his commission as a second lieutenant May 1980 and was designated an Army aviator in September 1981. Williams completed a three-year assignment in Germany where he served in the 3rd Armored Division’s aviation battalion. Following his return to the United States, Williams completed a graduate program in Aeronautical Engineering, and was subsequently selected for an Army assignment at the Johnson Space Center (JSC), where he served in various capacities supporting the Space Shuttle Program. In 1992, Williams attended the Naval Test Pilot School, and subsequently served as an experimental test pilot and the Flight Test Division Chief in the Army’s Airworthiness Qualification Test Directorate at Edwards Air Force Base, California. Williams retired from active duty in 2007 after more than 27 years of service.
Williams has logged approximately 3,000 hours in more than 50 different aircraft.
NASA EXPERIENCE: Williams was selected for the NASA Astronaut Class of 1996. In addition to his space flights, he has performed various technical duties in both the space shuttle and International Space Station Programs. Williams has served in the Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA), Space Station, and Soyuz Branches of the Astronaut Office, led the development of a space shuttle cockpit upgrade, and completed temporary assignments at Marshall Space Flight Center supporting the test and evaluation of the International Space Station Laboratory Module and at NASA Headquarters in support of legislative affairs. In July 2002, Williams commanded a nine-day coral reef expedition operating from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Aquarius undersea habitat off the coast of Florida. Williams has also served on the space station backup flight crews for Expeditions 12, 19, and 20. During his three flights, Williams logged over 362 days in space, including more than 19 hours in three EVAs.
National Aeronautics and Space Administration April 2015
Click photo for downloadable high-res version
SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: Williams served as the flight engineer and lead space walker for space shuttle flight STS-101. STS-101 Atlantis (May 19 through May 29, 2000) was the third shuttle mission devoted to space station construction. Objectives for the 10-day flight included transporting and installing over 5,000 pounds of equipment and supplies, and included Williams’ first EVA lasting nearly 7 hours.
In 2006, Williams served as flight engineer for Expedition 13, launching on March 29 on the Russian Soyuz TMA-8 from Baikonur, Kazakhstan and docking with the station on March 31. During the six-month tour of duty aboard the International Space Station, Williams performed two successful space walks (one Russia and one USA) logging an additional 12 hours and 25 minutes of EVA, and also saw the arrival of two space shuttle missions, the resumption of construction of the orbiting laboratory, and the restoration of a three-person expedition crew. The Expedition 13 mission concluded on September 28 with a safe landing in central Kazakhstan.
On his third space flight, Williams served as a Flight Engineer on Expedition 21 and commanded Expedition 22, again launching from Baikonur on Soyuz TMA-16 on September 30 and docking on October 2, 2009. During his second 6-month stay onboard the International Space Station, Williams again saw the arrival of two space shuttle missions as well as the integration of a Russian Mini-Research Module, the US Tranquility Module, and the Cupola. His third flight concluded on March 18, 2010, with the Soyuz landing in Kazakhstan.
Williams recently completed training as a backup for the one-year flight spanning Expeditions 43-46 that began in March 2015. He is currently in training for the prime crew for Expeditions 47, as Flight Engineer, and Expedition 48, as Commander, scheduled to launch in March 2016.
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SKRIPOCHKA OLEG IVANOVICH
SOYUZ TMA FLIGHT ENGINEER
ISS FLIGHT ENGINEER
RSC ENERGIA TEST-COSMONAUT
PERSONAL DATA:  Born December 24, 1969 in Nevinnomysk, Stavropol Region, Russia.  Married to Elena Vladimirovna Milovanova.  They have a daughter, Darya, born in 2005, and a son, Denis, born in 2008.  Oleg’s hobbies include parachute sport and bicycle tourism. 
EDUCATION:  Graduated from physics and mathematics high school #28 Zaporozhye in 1987 where he was a member of the Young Cosmonauts group named after V. Komarov.  He then entered the Bauman State Technical University.  He graduated in 1993 with a bachelor degree in mechanical engineering. 
AWARDS:  “Gagarin pin” from the Federal Space Agancy. 
EXPERIENCE:  From 1987 through 1991, Skripochka had work experience at RSC Energia as a test subject, test mechanic, and as a mechanic from 1991 to 1993 at the project department.  After graduating from the Bauman State Technical University he worked at the Russian Space Corporation Energia from 1993 - 1997 as an engineer at the transport and cargo vehicles ground hardware development and testing project department.  Oleg is a 1st class sky diver with 300 parachute jumps.
SPACEFLIGHT TRAINING:  In August 1997,  he was selected  as an RSC Energia cosmonaut-candidate. 
From December 1997 - November 1999,  he completed basic spaceflight training.  In November, 1999 he was qualified as a test cosmonaut.
Since January 2000,  he trained in the test-cosmonaut group for the ISS program.
From April, 2007 - April, 2008 he trained as an ISS-17 backup crewmember (Soyuz TMA and ISS flight engineer).
Skripochka served as flight engineer aboard the Soyuz TMA-M when it launched October 7, 2010 to the International Space Station.  During his 5-month stay aboard the station, he served as a flight engineer for Expedition 25/26, spending 159 days in space.
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ALEXEY NIKOLAEVICH OVCHININ
RUSSIAN TEST-COSMONAUT
PERSONAL DATA: Born September 28, 1971 in Rybinsk, Yaroslavl Region, Russia.
EDUCATION: Graduated from the Eisk Air Force Pilot School as pilot-engineer in 1992.
SPACEFLIGHT TRAINING: He was selected as a test-cosmonaut candidate of the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center Cosmonaut Office in October of 2006. Ovchinin finished basic space training in June 2009, and was qualified as test-cosmonaut.
EXPERIENCE: From August 1992 till February 1998 he served as an instructor-pilot at the Eisk Air Force Pilot School, and from February 1998 till September 2003 as an instructor–pilot and then as an air flight commander of the Krasnodar Aviation Institute.
From October 2003 served as an air flight commander of the 70th Test training air regiment named after V.S.Seryogin. He flew Yak-52 and L-39 aircraft. He logged over 1300 hours of flight time.
Quelle: NASA
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Update: 6.01.2016
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News Conference Features Next Space Station Crew; Interviews Available
NASA astronaut Jeff Williams and cosmonauts Alexey Ovchinin and Oleg Skripochka of Roscomos (Russian Federal Space Agency) will launch to the space station aboard a Soyuz TMA-20M spacecraft March 18, 2016 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.
Credits: NASA
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NASA will host a news conference for the next crew launching to the International Space Station, featuring NASA astronaut Jeff Williams, on Thursday, Jan. 7, 2016, at the agency’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. NASA Television will broadcast the news conference live at 2 p.m. EST after airing b-roll video of crew training at 1:30 p.m. Both can be seen online at:
http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv
This will be Williams’ third long-duration stay on the space station. Joining him for Expedition 47 and 48 will be cosmonauts Alexey Ovchinin and Oleg Skripochka of Roscosmos (Russian Federal Space Agency). Williams will be the commander of Expedition 48.
Immediately after the news conference, all three crew members will be available for individual media interviews in person or by phone. To request credentials to attend, or to reserve an interview opportunity, U.S. media must contact the Johnson newsroom at 281-483-5111 by 6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 5.
Reporters who wish to participate in the news conference by telephone must contact the newsroom at least 10 minutes prior to its start. Those following the briefing on social media may ask questions using the hashtag #askNASA.
The trio will launch to the space station aboard a Soyuz TMA-20M spacecraft March 18, 2016, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to join Expedition 47 Commander Tim Kopra of NASA, astronaut Timothy Peake of ESA (European Space Agency), and cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko of Roscosmos.
During their six-month mission, the expedition crew members will facilitate approximately 250 research investigations and technology demonstrations not possible on Earth to advance scientific knowledge of Earth, space, physical, and biological sciences and benefit those on Earth. Science conducted also will enable future long-duration human and robotic exploration into deep space and on the agency’s journey to Mars.
The crew members are expected to be at the station for arrivals of American cargo spacecraft the SpaceX Dragon and Orbital ATK Cygnus. Williams can expect to enter the deployed Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM), a demonstration of expandable habitat technology that will be attached to the station for two years. During his time in space, the first International Docking Adapter to enable the arrival of future U.S. commercial crew spacecraft will be installed.
This mission will be Williams’ fourth spaceflight and third long-duration stay on the orbiting laboratory -- a first for an American – and will be his first return to the station since its completion in 2011. Williams served as the flight engineer and lead spacewalker for the space shuttle Atlantis STS-101 mission in 2000. He was a flight engineer for Expedition 13 in 2006, when the station only had two modules and three crew members. In 2009 and 2010, he served as a flight engineer on Expedition 21 and commanded Expedition 22, when the Tranquility module and cupola were added to the station. During that mission, he also conducted the first live interaction with the agency’s social media fans and followers.
During his three flights, Williams spent 19 hours conducting three spacewalks and logged 362 days in space. By the completion of this 172-day mission, Williams will become the American with the most cumulative days in space, 534 overall, surpassing Expedition 46 Commander Scott Kelly, who is about three quarters of the way through a one-year mission that will culminate in 520 total days in space.
Born in Superior, Wisconsin, Williams considers Winter, Wisconsin, to be his hometown. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Applied Science and Engineering from the U.S. Military Academy (USMA) in 1980, a Master of Science in Aeronautical Engineering and the degree of Aeronautical Engineer from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, both in 1987, a Master of Arts in National Security and Strategic Studies from the U.S. Naval War College in 1996, and an honorary Doctorate of Business Administration from Johnson and Wales University in 2007.
Quelle: NASA

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