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Raumfahrt - Japan´s HTV-4 Abdocken von ISS und Re-Entry-Update

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9.08.2013

Japan´s HTV-4 dockt erfolgreich an ISS

As the International Space Station was flying approximately 223 miles above eastern Europe, one of the Expedition 36 crew members exposed this image featuring part of the Canadian-built Space Station Remote Manipulator System or Canadarm2 in the foreground.
Image Credit: 
NASA
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The fourth Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency H-II Transfer Vehicle, or HTV-4 was installed on its berthing port on the Earth-facing side of the International Space Station’s Harmony node at 11:38 a.m. EDT Friday, delivering 3.6 tons of science experiments, equipment and supplies to the orbiting complex.

Flight Engineer Karen Nyberg, with the assistance of Flight Engineer Chris Cassidy, initially grappled the HTV-4 with the Canadian Space Agency-provided arm at 7:22 a.m. as the Japanese space freighter flew within about 30 feet of the complex. Flight Engineer Luca Parmitano of the European Space Agency joined the two NASA astronauts in the cupola to monitor the systems of the Japanese space freighter during its approach.

At the time of capture, the station was orbiting 260 miles just to the south of South Africa.With HTV-4 securely in the grasp of Canadarm2, the robotics team at the Johnson Space Center’s Mission Control Center remotely commanded the arm to guide HTV-4 to a ready-to-latch position on the Earth-facing port of the Harmony node.  Nyberg and Cassidy then used a laptop computer to conduct the initial bolting and first stage capture of Harmony’s Active Common Berthing Mechanism (ACBM) with HTV-4’s Passive Common Berthing Mechanism (PCBM).  Once that was done, the ground team completed the bolting process through second stage capture.Also known as Kounotori – Japanese for “white stork” because it is emblematic of an important delivery – the HTV is a 33-foot-long, 13-foot-diameter unmanned cargo transfer spacecraft capable of delivering both internal and external supplies and hardware to the station. HTV-4 launched from the Tanegashima Space Center in southern Japan on Aug.3 at 3:48 p.m. (Aug. 4 at 4:48 a.m., Japan time).

fter equalizing pressures between the cargo craft and the station, the crew is scheduled to open the hatches Saturday and begin the process of removing the supplies from the Kounotori’s pressurized logistics carrier.

Among the items within Kounotori’s pressurized section are test samples for research experiments inside the Kibo laboratory, a new freezer capable of preserving materials at temperatures below -90 F, four small CubeSat satellites to be deployed from Kibo’s airlock as well as food, water and other supplies for the station’s crew. The pressurized section also is delivering new hardware for the Robotic Refueling Mission to demonstrate robotic satellite-servicing tools, technologies and techniques.

The HTV-4’s unpressurized section is delivering two orbital replacement units (ORUs)  – a spare Main Bus Switching Unit (MBSU) and a spare Utility Transfer Assembly (UTA) –  to keep the space station’s electrical system operating smoothly.  The UTA maintains electrical continuity through the Solar Alpha Rotary Joint, passing electrical power generated by the complex’s huge solar arrays to station elements and payloads, while the MBSU provides switching capabilities for the various power channels and sources. ORUs are modular station components designed to be replaced periodically.

Also inside HTV’s unpressurized cargo hold is the Space Test Program – Houston 4 (STP-H4) payload, which is a suite of seven experiments for investigating space communications, Earth monitoring and materials science.

The exposed pallet to which all the unpressurized cargo is mounted will be removed from Kounotori by Canadarm2, handed off to the Japanese Experiment Module robotic arm and attached to a platform on the Kibo module’s Exposed Facility over the weekend.

In early September, the cargo vehicle will be filled with trash, detached from the station and sent to burn up in Earth's atmosphere.

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The International Space Station's Canadarm2 grapples the unpiloted Japanese "Kounotori" H-II Transfer Vehicle-4 (HTV-4) as it approaches the station.
Image Credit: 
Quelle:NASA
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Update: 30.08.2013

LIVE: Watch Japanese Cargo Ship Leave International Space Station

NASA Television will air live the departure of a Japanese cargo ship from the International Space Station at noon Wednesday, Sept. 4.

Expedition 36 Flight Engineer Karen Nyberg of NASA will use the station's robotic arm to detach the H-II Transport Vehicle (HTV)-4 from the space station's Harmony module. This will wrap up a month's stay at the orbiting laboratory, during which time more than 3.5 tons of supplies and spare parts were unloaded from the vehicle onto the space station. The departure frees up a space station docking port for the arrival of Orbital Sciences Corp.'s Cygnus cargo vehicle in late September.

 

NASA TV coverage will begin at 11 a.m. EDT with an expanded edition of "Space Station Live," featuring activities surrounding the HTV-4 departure.

HTV-4 launched from the Tanegashima Space Center in southern Japan on a Japanese H-IIB rocket Aug. 3. It arrived at the space station Aug. 9 and was installed on Harmony several hours after being grappled by Nyberg.

Quelle: NASA

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Update : 2.09.2013

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The Exposed Pallet (EP) of the HTV4 was reinstalled into KOUNOTORI's Unpressurized Logistics Carrier (ULC).

After removed from the EF by the JEM Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS), the EP was handed off to the station's robotic arm (Space Station Remote Manipulator System: SSRMS). Then, the EP was stowed into KOUNOTORI's ULC at 11:35 p.m. on August 30.
The US payload Space Test Program - Houston 3 (STP-H3), which is no longer necessary is mounted on the EP. It will be disposed with the HTV4's fiery reentry.
KOUNOTORI4's unberthing operations will begin on September 4 and leave the ISS on September 5.
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Quelle: JAXA

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Update: 3.09.2013

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With its mission to deliver more than three tons of supplies and spare parts completed, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s H-II Transfer Vehicle-4 (HTV-4) is being prepared for its Sept. 4 departure from the complex.  In concert with the robotics team at Mission Control Houston, Cassidy and Parmitano helped guide the station’s 57-foot robotic arm, Canadarm2, as it returned HTV-4’s Exposed Pallet and an attached Department of Defense payload back into the unpressurized section of the Japanese cargo ship. Earlier on Friday, the Exposed Pallet, which originally housed critical spare parts and the Space Test Payload-4 when it arrived to the station inside HTV-4, was removed from the exposed facility at the front end of the Kibo module by the Japanese experiment module’s robotic arm and Canadarm2.
With the pallet now securely stowed, the robotics team was given a “go” to attach Canadarm2 to a grapple fixture on HTV-4 in preparation for the robotic unberthing of the cargo craft from the Earth-facing port of the Harmony node on Wednesday. NASA TV will provide coverage of HTV-4’s departure, including its planned noon EDT release from Canadarm2, beginning at 11 a.m. Wednesday as part of the regularly scheduled Space Station Live program.  The unpiloted Japanese space freighter will be commanded to de-orbit on Sept. 7 for a destructive re-entry over the south Pacific Ocean.
The departure of HTV-4 will clear the way for the arrival of the Orbital Sciences Cygnus resupply ship on its first demonstration flight to the station.  Following its launch from the Wallops Flight Facility, Va. on Sept. 17, the U.S. commercial cargo craft will be robotically grappled and berthed to the station on Sept. 22 for a month-long stay at the station.
Quelle: NASA

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Update: 4.09.2013

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Using the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), KOUNOTORI4 (HTV4) was moved to the releasing point below the station and released from the SSRMS at 1:20 a.m., September 5.
After the release, KOUNOTORI4 performed separation maneuvers to leave from the ISS proximity.
KOUNOTORI4 will perform three deorbit maneuvers on September 7 and is scheduled to reenter into the atmosphere at 3:36 p.m., the same day.
Quelle: JAXA

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The Expedition 36 crew released Japan’s H-II Transfer Vehicle-4 (HTV-4) cargo craft Wednesday at 12:20 p.m. EDT ending its one-month stay at the International Space Station.  Expedition 36 Flight Engineer Karen Nyberg, operating from the station’s cupola robotics work station, used the Canadarm2 to release the cargo craft. Robotic ground controllers at Mission Control, Houston unberthed the HTV-4 from the Earth-facing port of the Harmony module at 8:07 a.m.
HTV-4 will maneuver to a safe distance away from the station where it will be commanded by Japanese flight controllers to deorbit on Saturday, Sept. 7. The craft, now loaded with trash, will burn up as it reenters the Earth’s atmosphere over the Pacific Ocean.
The HTV-4, also known as the “Kounotori-4” for a white stork symbolizing a special delivery, brought up 3.5 tons supplies and gear when it was attached to Harmony. Its departure leaves open Harmony’s docking port for the arrival of the Orbital Sciences Corporation’s Cygnus commercial cargo craft due to arrive in late September.
Orbital Sciences will be the second commercial space company to launch a cargo craft to the International Space Station. They are conducting a demonstration mission of its Cygnus cargo vehicle that is scheduled to launch Sept. 17 as part of NASA’s Commercial Orbital Transportation Services program. The mission will demonstrate the Cygnus’ rendezvous and berthing capabilities to the space station.
Meanwhile, Expedition 36 Commander Pavel Vinogradov, Flight Engineer Alexander Misurkin and NASA Flight Engineer Chris Cassidy continued their crew departure preparations. The crew participated in onboard Soyuz descent training and conducted an equipment and stowage briefing.
The Soyuz TMA-08M spacecraft is being readied for its return to Earth on Sept. 10, U.S. time, to bring home Vinogradov, Misurkin and Cassidy. The spacefarers are packing their Soyuz while their replacements on the ground, Expedition 37/38 crew members Oleg Kotov, Mike Hopkins and Sergey Ryazanskiy prepare for their launch aboard the Soyuz TMA-10M spacecraft on Sept. 25, U.S. time. They will dock to the Poisk mini-research module after four orbits, or about six hours later.
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Frams: NASA-TV
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Quelle: NASA

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Update: 6.09.2013 

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Using the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), KOUNOTORI4 (HTV4) was moved to the releasing point below the station and released from the SSRMS at 1:20 a.m., September 5.
After the release, KOUNOTORI4 performed separation maneuvers to leave from the ISS proximity.
KOUNOTORI4 will perform three deorbit maneuvers on September 7 and is scheduled to reenter into the atmosphere at 3:36 p.m., the same day.
 
 
 
Quelle: JAXA

Rückblick: Ankunft von HTV-4 bei ISS

 

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HTV-4 bei Abdock-Manöver

 

Quelle: JAXA

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Update: 8.09.2013

JAXA space cargo transporter re-enters atmosphere after ending ISS mission

An unmanned space cargo transporter operated by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency re-entered Earth’s atmosphere around 3:30 p.m. Saturday and burned up over the Pacific, after completing its mission.

The Konotori No. 4 was equipped with a so-called i-Ball device to videotape its re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere and beam back images before disintegrating.

Launched Aug. 4 from the Tanegashima Space Center in Kagoshima Prefecture, the Konotori No. 4 ferried about 5.4 tons of supplies to the International Space Station, including the talking humanoid robot Kirobo and an advanced camera to capture images of comets. It docked at the ISS on Aug. 10.

The vehicle was spun off from the ISS and released into space by a robotic arm Thursday, loaded with rubbish and items no longer necessary, such as used equipment for experiments.

Quelle: The Japan Times

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HTV4 reentry (Credit: JAXA/NASA)

KOUNOTORI4 (HTV4) descended to an altitude of 120km and reentered Earth's atmosphere around 3:37p.m. on September 7. KOUNOTORI4 successfully completed its cargo supply mission to the ISS.

Quelle: JAXA

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Update: 9.09.2013 - Frams JAXA-TV von HTV-4 Abdocken von ISS und Re-Entry.

Re-Entry Aufnahmen von HTV-4

 

HTV-4-Mission erfolgreich beendet

Quelle: JAXA

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Update: 12.09.2013

Japanese Cargo Ship Enters Atmosphere
ISS036-E-041384 (7 Sept. 2013) --- A stationary camera onboard the International Space Station took this picture of the Japanese HTV-4 cargo spacecraft as it entered Earth’s atmosphere on Sept. 7, subsequently burning up. HTV-4 was launched by Japan's Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) on Aug. 4 of this year in order to bring up supplies for the astronauts and cosmonauts onboard the station, and after spending a month docked to the orbital outpost, it was released on Sept. 4.
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Quelle: NASA
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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